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Local News

  • UNWANTED, UNLOVED

    Kathyrn Howell of Dry Ridge already had a new puppy.

    Boy, was she surprised when her granddaughter saw a black vehicle shove two Golden Retrievers and a small Chihuahua/terrior mix house dog out and drive away in front of her home on Cason Lane.

    She was even more surprised when one of the retrievers gave birth to 10 small, fuzzy babies – a litter of all girl puppies.

    Howell was only able to save eight of the puppies.

  • Time to spruce up!

    If you’ve got a bunch of old tires, car batteries and fluorescent light bulbs lying around your home and don’t know where to dispose of them, you’re in luck.

    The Grant County Solid Waste Management District is sponsoring a free tire disposal from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on April 14, April 15 and April 16 at the state road department on U.S. 25, south of Williamstown.

    This program is part of the Kentucky Tire Amnesty Program, which is held every three to four years in all Kentucky counties.

  • SKIN DEEP

    In the 1960s, tattooing was considered anti-social, but by the 1990s it was a trendy fashion statement. Today tattoos on rock stars, professional sports figures and even Christian rock musicians are commonplace.

    Daryl Anness has had a broad spectrum of careers, from welder to certified nurse’s assistant, but none more colorful than his current one as proprietor of Jadloc Tattooing.

    “It’s a passion,” Anness says. “ I love it.” I started out getting tattoos when I was 17.”

  • GCHS To Hold FFA Banquet April 20

    The Grant County High School Future Farmers of America will hold a banquet for members and their families at 6 p.m. April 20 in the high school auditorium. Dinner will be provided by Buetels. New officers will be installed. Students are free and nonmembers will cost $3. Reservations and payment must be received by Richard Gater, the agriculture teacher,  by April 12.
     

  • Abramson to visit April 12

    Gerry Abramson, who is running for Lieutenant Governor, on the Steve Beshear ticket, will be meeting with Grant County residents at 2 p.m. on April 12 at the Dry Ridge Toyota Community Room.

  • Tourism seeks new home after dispute

    The direction of the Grant County Tourist and Convention Commission is up in the air after a proposed agreement with the Industrial Development Authority to handle administrative duties fell through.

    The commission voted unanimously during its Feb. 16 meeting to dissolve the position of executive director effective March 1 and contract administrative services with the IDA.

    The move would save the tourism commission a little more than $10,000 per year, according to commission member Randy Slayback, who made the motion to dissolve the position.

  • Farmers file lawsuit

    Thomas Leach has raised tobacco since he was 12 years old.

    But, the 41-year-old Dry Ridge resident said last year’s crop was his last.

    Leach and Larry O’Neill of Dry Ridge have joined farmers Jerry Feagan and Steve Lang of Cynthiana in a breach of contract class-action lawsuit against a tobacco company.

    The Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati law firm of Strauss & Troy filed the lawsuit in Harrison County on behalf of a number of Kentucky tobacco farmers against Universal Corporation, also known as Universal Leaf North America (ULNA).

  • Branching Out

    The City of Williamstown has a tree board and they’re hoping to branch out this spring.

    Establishing a tree board was an idea that Catherine Cahill, a Williamstown resident, presented to the council last spring.

    Her goal was to improve the appearance of the city.

    “There are other cities where this has worked,” Cahill said. “Midway is an attractive town and the city of Walton, who has a tree program, looks better than we do.”

  • ARK: YES OR NO?

    Is the Ark really coming to Grant County?

    Yes, yes, yes – at least that’s what Grant County officials say about the proposed $150 million project that developers announced in December 2010 would locate on a 160-acre site off the Williamstown exit at Ky. 36.

    “The developers have been in town this week, working on the project,” said Williamstown Mayor Rick Skinner.

    Skinner said he met with some of the project developers for dinner on March 21.

  • It's a "small world" at St. Elizabeth