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Opinion

  • The Kentucky League of Cities and the Kentucky Association of Counties, among other organizations, have been in the media quite a bit lately because of perks paid to their leaders, lax oversight by their board members, and an otherwise insensitive attitude toward the taxpayers who pay for it all.

  • Did you know that Grant County’s Chapter of the American Red Cross needs volunteers?

    Did you know that Horse Heritage Days had nearly as many teams as the Kentucky State Fair?

    Did you know who died in our community last week or who was arrested for breaking the law this week?

    Did you know which students were named star students and who got married or celebrated an anniversary or the birth of a new baby?

  • If you see me driving around Grant County, there is a 95 percent chance I’m singing in my car.

    If you see me leaving the Grant County News office, there’s probably a 75 percent chance I’m whistling a song that’s stuck in my head.

    But there is always a 100 percent chance that I’ve always got music on my mind.

    Music is something that I am passionate about. I love getting the chance to hear new music. It’s not that I’m just hearing a new song, but I get someone else’s perspective on life.

  • The date has been set for the last “Feed the People” charity dinner. I’ll refresh your memory as to what has happened so far.

    The Free Kitchen, located in downtown Dry Ridge and easily recognizable by the FREE LUNCH sign on the sidewalk, feeds our community’s hungry every weekday from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

    It is a simple process. Anyone needing a meal goes inside and immediately begins filling their tray. There are no questions, forms or strings attached.

  • Being a first-time parent has been a learning experience throughout my son’s first two years of his young life.

    From thinking he was never going to crawl to trying feverishly to catch up to him as he ran around the house, it’s been amazing seeing how he has grown.

    Nothing puts a brighter smile on my face then coming home from working and hearing those precious two words, “Hi, daddy!”

    On the other side, I sure all parents know that not every moment of your child’s life is bliss.

    Sometimes, you get frustrated.

  • Last week, I was in the guidance counselor’s office at Grant County High School listening to Jodi Mulligan and Amy Caudill talk about Mulligan’s recent home renovations.

    After a while, I asked, “Is this what adults talk about?”

    Because I’m 24 years old, lived in my apartment for about a year and haven’t done anything to decorate.

    I mean, I have bills, work 50 hours a week and have to cook and clean for myself, but I never thought about “growing up.”

  • How interesting…  When I was young, to hear a speech by the President of the United States was a good thing.  And, because I was and am an American; to listen to the President was a given.  He is, after all, the elected leader of our country, indeed the embodiment of our country.

    However, apparently my views are old, antiquated and, well in some views, apparently un-American.

  • Just when the weight of the world nearly embeds me into the suffocating depths of dust, something comes along and gives me strength to stand up again.

    Into my office comes Kayla Eversole.

    I met Kayla earlier in the summer. This young lady was with her mother, or possibly young grandmother, at the front desk. I initiated a conversation. Usually these conversations begin with me saying something like, “Hey, why aren’t you in school?”

  • The restless night of sleep the night before.

    The nervous butterflies in my stomach.

    The dread of getting up before the sun.

    No matter what year it was, those feelings always seemed to go through me when it was time to go back to school.

    I did not hate school.

    In fact, I liked it quite a bit.

    I think it was that sense of the unknown, not knowing what the teachers would be like, who would be in your classes and if you would survive another year.

  • Summer in Kentucky means it is hot, sticky and humid. I’m not particularly fond of either of the three but this summer is different.

    Experts say you can blame it on El Nino, or a period of warm seas that lasts for about three months.

    I’m mad at that El Nino because it’s his fault the tomatoes were late getting ripe.

  • When my car started to shiver, I knew I was in trouble.

    I don’t have a good history with cars, blowing transmissions in my previous two cars. This time, I was heading south on U.S. 25 and felt the car shake. I was hoping that I could get the car back to Dry Ridge, but halfway up a hill, it stopped and I blocked the entire lane.

    In these situations, a person can learn a lot about themselves and about the people around them.

  • Dear Kentucky State Trooper; this column allows Ken Stone one of the following: free roll through stop sign; speeding up to 40 miles over the limit; or one free hand gesturing road rage incident involving others lack of ability to merge.

    I’m hoping that the trooper will only read the paragraph above, say, “OK” and send me on my way. Let me explain why I should receive the above, and possibly you too.

  • Ferris Bueller said, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

    I’ve seen that come true this summer. The only way I can think to write my last column is to stop, look around and share a few ‘snapshots’ from my internship with you.

    My first week as an intern I was assigned an economy story. Jamie told me to see what I could get out of locals dealing with the economy and how it’s affecting them personally.

  • Some people simply amaze me.

    People who drive 20 miles under the speed limit while traffic backs up for miles.

    Celebrities who believe their political opinion means more than anyone else who has a vote.

    Parents who do not care to pay enough attention to their kids and their safety.

    The list of my pet peeves is endless.

    However, two weeks ago I witnessed acts of kindness all over Grant County that amazed me in a positive way more than anything I’ve seen in awhile.

  • When people seek to exploit economic, social, or other ills for purely political purposes the result is inevitably a skewed, oversimplified analysis of the problem, its causes and potential solutions. Such was the case with a recent column that contemptuously mocked the efforts of conservatives – republicans, democrats, and independents alike – to stem the rapidly rising tide of government intervention, control and spending.

  • Grant County lost two lovely ladies last week.

    Miss Della Jones and Mrs. Geneva (Mam-maw) Hutchison were a lot a like.

    Miss Della, Grant County’s oldest resident at 106, was a joy to be around. She had the most beautiful smile that managed to light up her dark eyes. She was soft spoken and genteel, but when she did speak, her words carried a lot of wisdom and thought.

    I first met Miss Della when she turned 100. That interview was one I’ll never forget because she was such a character. I spent an enjoyable afternoon talking with her about her life.

  • I usually do not answer a squeaky wheel, but when one complains about a “ludicrous mix of disinformation, misinformation” and then uses the press to mislead the public, I just can’t help but to get out the can of oil. Bill Adkins’ rants about the Tea Party in last week’s Grant County News and like any good liberal, he uses smoke screens in the form of attacks on the previous administration to hide the devastating policies of the current liberal administration.

  • On April 15, 2009 I, unintentionally, attended a Tea Party event at the Grant County Courthouse

    ‘Unintentionally’ because it was held on the same day as the circuit court met (and that was probably why others happened to attend) I simply walked into it. I was offended by the lack of fact in the fiction presented by the speakers. It was dishonest and shameful.

    I listened to such a ludicrous mix of disinformation, misinformation and, well, lies, that when asked if anyone else wanted to speak, I was inspired to raise my hand.

  • There’s been a lot of hype about tea parties lately and I just want to give my opinion on the whole thing.

    I have been researching the economy’s problems and solutions, listening to political voices and talking to family and friends. I don’t watch hours of CNN or talk shows every day but I do stay up on current affairs in the news, catch the occasional O’Reilly on TV and listen to Bill Cunningham on radio. I consider myself an informed citizen, which I find rare these days.

  • Luck would have it that I have been fortunate enough to see two of my best friends fall in love.

    My freshman year at Presbyterian College, Jay Wilson and Marianne Shaddrix met each other. Jay was a fraternity brother of mine and we went through the trials and tribulations of pledgeship together.

    Jay and Marianne started dating each other and there was always something about them. It seemed like such a perfect match. I can’t imagine two better people and I’m glad they found each other.