• Hello Grant County. My name is Matt Birkholtz and I am the new sports reporter for The Grant County News. I would like to share my story and how I got to this point in my life.

    I am 24 years old and am from Aurora, Ind. I remember loving sports since I was 5 years old and can remember watching the Cincinnati Reds, pretending to be like Eric Davis and Barry Larkin, sliding into the television set as they won the 1990 World Series.

  • Where has July gone? I’m pretty sure I just turned my calendar to July and it’s already July 22 and the Grant County Fair gets underway this weekend.

    Geesh, where did the summer go?

    You can count on two things when it’s fair time – heat and rain!

    Last year, the move of the Grant County Fair from Crittenden to its new home at the Northern Kentucky Fairgrounds on Baton Rouge Road in Williamstown was overcast, pardon the pun, by the deluge of rain we received.

  • Wondering how you can make a difference in the life of a youth? Many studies in the past two decades have confirmed that youth having caring and supportive relationships with their family members is critical for raising healthy, resilient youth.

  • I have played soccer since I was 5 years old.

    For me, it is my American pastime.

    As the 2010 World Cup winds down, there are some things that have been boiling over for many years that I have to get off of my chest.

    First of all, for those who are in the dark, the World Cup is the tournament of all tournaments pitting 36 of the best international teams in the world against each other.

    This year’s tournament is being played in South Africa, but for many sports talk show hosts, it would not matter if it was played right here in the Unites States.

  • Have you ever felt like an under achiever? Do you always have the feeling that no matter what you are engaged in, you should be doing something else? Whatever I do—I always feel like it’s not enough. I don’t know, maybe it’s a “woman thing,” the endless guilt trip that we travel on life’s highway.

  • Today’s topic is the Tea Party, a so – called political ‘phenomenon.’  Actually, the facts behind the hype show that the Tea Party is not so phenomenal and that as time has passed, and despite claims, it has proven inconsequential and is fading.  

  • Unable to attack the message, the left has chosen to attack the messengers. Unable to prevail in the arena of ideas, they have set out to marginalize the players. Funny thing, though, for eight years we were told that criticizing the government was the highest form of patriotism. Now, we’re told its racism.

  • It may be cliche, but life really is filled with peaks and valleys.

    In December, my wife and I were on top of the world as we found out that she was pregnant with our second child.

    We were overjoyed at the reality that in nine short months we would be adding to our family.

    We were hoping first that it would be a healthy baby.

    Then, we were crossing our fingers that it would be a girl since we already have the best son in the world.

    Only weeks into the pregnancy, we got devastating news.

  • Many times in these columns I’ve written about how I came to Grant County right before my 22nd birthday.

    Now, I’m leaving about two months before I turn 25.

    Over the course of those three years, I’ve learned a lot about this county and the people within.

    During my first few months here, I learned the lay of the land and met a lot of people who helped me get acquainted with my new home.

  • I remember, as a kid, how the older men would spin a yarn and pull my leg with stories and anecdotes that entertained me. Occasionally an opportunity arises to which I can continue good stewardship and instill a new generation with thought.

  • While some businesses may never hear when their customers are upset, a community newspaper is different.

    After the many calls we’ve received wondering where the TV listings are, I know we’ve got some unhappy customers.

    The TV listings have been part of the Grant County News since 1992. As times changed, so did the look and information they contained. We’ve been happy to provide our readers with this service, but unfortunately we will no longer be able to include them inside our pages.

  • It’s funny when I look back on my time in high school because when it was over, I thought that things would never be the same.

    I had a world set up where I knew mostly everybody, could leave during free periods and was cruising through my senior year enjoying every moment.

    I had lived in Augusta for 13 years and knew every street and what I liked and loved about the city.

    But after I graduated high school, I knew that life was going to change, sooner rather than later.

  • I spent Mother’s Day in West Virginia with my mother, Reda Cochran Bailes, and her sisters, Erma and Velma. Or as my great nephew Ethan wrote, when he was 7-years old, in his essay, “We have a big dinner on Mother’s Day, and the ‘Ants’ come.”

  • I should have known something was amiss because everything seemed out of whack on Monday and by Monday night, I knew why.

    There in the sky – shining bright and round was a full moon and a full moon means people act strange.

    It’s during a full moon that we often get strange phone calls at the News office, asking us about strange things in the community.

    During a full moon, the phones will ring incessantly and the News office becomes a revolving door of visitors.

  • I used to be in decent enough shape.

    I mean, I’ve never had what anyone would confuse as muscular arms.

    The only six-pack that could be used to describe me is the liters of Mountain Dew I used to drink in high school.

    But, I was an active kid whose legs were deceptively strong from playing soccer constantly and I could run around all day without tiring.

    My how things have changed.

    My eating habits are about the same, if not a tad worse, but the difference is my body can’t work off the calories in my new couch potato exercise routine.

  • I am not good at golf.

    Wait, not good doesn’t do my skills justice. I’m terrible.

    I’ve only gotten out and played a couple times, but despite my skills, I love the game.

    I can go out and stink it up for 18 holes, but there is always that one shot or one putt that is perfect and makes me fall in love with the game and makes me want to come back.

    It’s the game that is so frustrating, but so relaxing.

    But it took me a while to get to this place.

  • I suppose that 99.9 percent of us can be considered to have racist tendencies whether we recognize them in ourselves or whether we don’t. That .01 percent that doesn’t have such tendencies is probably you.

    I have never walked in the shoes of a hardcore racist, though I could have easily been influenced by my parents who were influenced by their parents in a world considerably different from our world today.

  • I don’t know if I’m just noticing things as I get older or what, but it seems that lately I’m noticing some stupid people out and about.

    Don’t get me wrong we’ve all done stupid things at one point in our lives. Some of them probably more stupid or worse than others, but I’m noticing a trend lately and it’s got me worried.

    The other morning as I was sitting at the entrance of Hogan’s Mill preparing to turn right onto the Dry Ridge Bypass, I observed a man, driving a maroon Chevrolet, drive past.

  • When people are near blindness, straining to see through thick-lens glasses, people, in general, admire their courage and have some sympathy for their challenges. I’m pretty sure if someone is completely deaf, they are also extending understanding.

    Not so, for the hard-of-hearing. People yell at them. Sure, it’s what they have to do to get them to hear, but it’s usually mixed with a good dose of, “You’re really annoying.”

  • It totally amazes me what has happened to our political parties and people. Decisions are being made along party lines—no matter if they have any substance or reasoning. People are adhering to lies that have been told and retold until the liars believe the lies themselves.