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Opinion

  • Most people know an addict or have been touched by heroin or some other drug. In some way, I never thought it would affect my family or me in such a tremendous manner.

  • The week of Sept.17 through Sept. 23 is recognized as Constitution Week.
    The Constitution was written in the same Pennsylvania Statehouse where the Declaration of Independence was signed and George Washington received his commission as commander of the Continental Army. It’s now called Independence Hall.
    Written in 1787, the Constitution was signed on Sept. 17, but it wasn’t until 1788 that it was ratified by the necessary nine states. Also of the written National Constitutions, the U.S. Constitution is the oldest and shortest.

  • Kentucky’s pension systems are in critical condition. While certain state retirement plans are arguably in “better shape” than others are, every system is severely underfunded and rapidly spiraling downward towards a single outcome: no more money to pay Kentucky’s retirees.
    Understandably, retirees and those nearing retirement are concerned. Over the past 10 years, Kentucky’s pension systems have lost more than $7 billion in value.

  • One of the toughest things a parent will do is send their child to college. I have done it twice and still find myself worrying: Are they eating enough? Meeting new friends? Finding time to study?
    Fortunately, parents today have much less to stress about when it comes to their children’s health. Thanks to modern medicine and immunizations, we no longer live in fear of many serious illnesses that once posed massive threats.

  • I was encouraged to read the article in the Aug.17 issue of the Grant County News reporting that Dry Ridge continues to boom due to Ark Encounter tourism, and that much-needed hotels and restaurants are being built there. Meanwhile, business leaders all over northern Kentucky are using words like “phenomenal” to describe the impact the Ark and our sister attraction the Creation Museum are having on the regional economy.
    If you happen to own one of the hundreds of hotels in Northern Kentucky, Lexington/Georgetown and even parts of Cincinnati, you are happy.

  • I have worked closely with the Ark Encounter since Answers in Genesis announced the project in December of 2010.  Because of my work for the Ark Encounter, I was granted the privilege of cutting the ribbon at the opening ceremony.  As I stated then, we have had our issues and debates on how things should be, but we always work them out in a professional manner.  I think the safety assessment fee controversy has been the first issue to receive this much media attention.

  • From the beginning of our administration, we have set the goal of making Kentucky the engineering and manufacturing hub of excellence in the world. We are off to a good start. We recently shattered our annual record for new economic development projects and we did so in only the first five months of 2017.  
    Many factors weigh into the decisions of businesses to expand or locate their facilities in our state. However, every business leader I meet with emphasizes the quality of our workforce as one of their most critical considerations.

  • For the nearly 900,000 smokers in Kentucky, there has never been a better time to quit.
    During the 2017 legislative session, the General Assembly passed much needed legislation to equip individuals addicted to tobacco with the tools they need to quit successfully. The smoking cessation coverage bill (Senate Bill 89) removes barriers that limit patient access to evidence-based cessation treatments.

  • As we turn the page on July 2017, I find myself asking the same question once again, “Is summer over already?” To the disappointment of most Kentucky students, and many parents, the answer is an overwhelming “yes.”
    In Senate District 17, Scott County students will report back for classes on Thursday, Aug. 10. For Grant County students, the first day back is either Monday, Aug. 14, or Tuesday, Aug. 15, depending on your grade. In Kenton County, students are due back a bit later: Wednesday, August 23.

  • Opioid abuse is one of Kentucky’s most pressing and publicized health issues. In 2016, more than 1,400 Kentuckians died from opioid overdoses. That’s an average of nearly four deaths per day.
    These alarming statistics have made curbing opioid abuse a statewide priority—and Kentuckians of all backgrounds and sectors are committed to finding solutions.

  • I lived in Grant County 40 years, just recently moving to Richwood after my husband’s passing. I am deeply concerned about Williamstown and Grant County, in general.
    I am reading and hearing a lot of criticism about the Ark Encounter, and I am truly puzzled.

  • When I first started my job as a news reporter here at the Grant County News, I was both excited, and nervous.
    This was my first official job after graduating college in 2016, after several years of working both journalism and public relations internships, as well as working for my university’s student newspaper.

  • The Ark Encounter celebrated its first anniversary this month but instead of fanfare and praise, some news media and protestors poured rain on its parade. The Biblical theme park, which consists of a life-size replica of Noah's Ark based in Northern Kentucky, faced 75 protesters and criticism from a columnist who said the group promotes "fringe beliefs." But hey, it’s the Ark, right?  Compared to criticism that Noah faced, I'm sure this modern-day rendition will weather the storm.

  • I was glad to read the piece in the Grant County News by former Judge Executive Shirley Howard about the tourism boom experienced by Grant County due to the Ark Encounter.

  • I’m a man, a father and a husband. I’m also a boss and a judge. I also believe in magic.
    I got married in 1981 to my wife. We have two children.
    The children are older now but when they were younger they were involved in many things; sports, activities and school, just to name a few. At the same time, they were well fed, wore clean clothes and always cared for when they became ill. My children are respectful, mannerly and great people.

  • In the past three years, the Kentucky Backyard Beekeepers have greatly expanded our activities at the Grant County Fair.
    From just a few honey entries, we’ve offered a full honey show with categories in various grades of honey, hive products, food, art and crafts.

  • Skydiving was on my bucket list. It’s number 56, in fact. I kind of had it penciled in for the summer of 2015, and then my best friend turned 40 and decided that’s what he wanted to do to celebrate. BINGO!
    Weeks leading up to the event I was pure bottled excitement and eager anticipation.
    As the day drew closer, I started to feel my excitement turn slightly to nervousness and the night before, I was progressively overcome by sheer, paralyzing terror.

  • As former Judge Executive of Grant County, I'm thrilled to hear that the Ark Encounter had an excellent first year and that businesses that cater to Ark tourists are booming. I hope to be seeing additional hotels and restaurants being built in Williamstown and then watching the kind of economic benefits that Dry Ridge, with its many tourism amenities, has been experiencing.
    I'm also happy to know that as a result of the Ark's financial success, the tax burden on Grant Countians will be lessened.

  • Grant County, thank you!
    The Grant County News has allowed me the opportunity to write about the tremendous success of the Ark Encounter now that it’s been open one year.
    Media from all over the world have toured this massive ship, and we have appreciated all the extensive global coverage—including the fair and accurate reporting of this newspaper.