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Opinion

  • I have worked closely with the Ark Encounter since Answers in Genesis announced the project in December of 2010.  Because of my work for the Ark Encounter, I was granted the privilege of cutting the ribbon at the opening ceremony.  As I stated then, we have had our issues and debates on how things should be, but we always work them out in a professional manner.  I think the safety assessment fee controversy has been the first issue to receive this much media attention.

  • From the beginning of our administration, we have set the goal of making Kentucky the engineering and manufacturing hub of excellence in the world. We are off to a good start. We recently shattered our annual record for new economic development projects and we did so in only the first five months of 2017.  
    Many factors weigh into the decisions of businesses to expand or locate their facilities in our state. However, every business leader I meet with emphasizes the quality of our workforce as one of their most critical considerations.

  • For the nearly 900,000 smokers in Kentucky, there has never been a better time to quit.
    During the 2017 legislative session, the General Assembly passed much needed legislation to equip individuals addicted to tobacco with the tools they need to quit successfully. The smoking cessation coverage bill (Senate Bill 89) removes barriers that limit patient access to evidence-based cessation treatments.

  • As we turn the page on July 2017, I find myself asking the same question once again, “Is summer over already?” To the disappointment of most Kentucky students, and many parents, the answer is an overwhelming “yes.”
    In Senate District 17, Scott County students will report back for classes on Thursday, Aug. 10. For Grant County students, the first day back is either Monday, Aug. 14, or Tuesday, Aug. 15, depending on your grade. In Kenton County, students are due back a bit later: Wednesday, August 23.

  • Opioid abuse is one of Kentucky’s most pressing and publicized health issues. In 2016, more than 1,400 Kentuckians died from opioid overdoses. That’s an average of nearly four deaths per day.
    These alarming statistics have made curbing opioid abuse a statewide priority—and Kentuckians of all backgrounds and sectors are committed to finding solutions.

  • I lived in Grant County 40 years, just recently moving to Richwood after my husband’s passing. I am deeply concerned about Williamstown and Grant County, in general.
    I am reading and hearing a lot of criticism about the Ark Encounter, and I am truly puzzled.

  • When I first started my job as a news reporter here at the Grant County News, I was both excited, and nervous.
    This was my first official job after graduating college in 2016, after several years of working both journalism and public relations internships, as well as working for my university’s student newspaper.

  • The Ark Encounter celebrated its first anniversary this month but instead of fanfare and praise, some news media and protestors poured rain on its parade. The Biblical theme park, which consists of a life-size replica of Noah's Ark based in Northern Kentucky, faced 75 protesters and criticism from a columnist who said the group promotes "fringe beliefs." But hey, it’s the Ark, right?  Compared to criticism that Noah faced, I'm sure this modern-day rendition will weather the storm.

  • I was glad to read the piece in the Grant County News by former Judge Executive Shirley Howard about the tourism boom experienced by Grant County due to the Ark Encounter.

  • I’m a man, a father and a husband. I’m also a boss and a judge. I also believe in magic.
    I got married in 1981 to my wife. We have two children.
    The children are older now but when they were younger they were involved in many things; sports, activities and school, just to name a few. At the same time, they were well fed, wore clean clothes and always cared for when they became ill. My children are respectful, mannerly and great people.

  • In the past three years, the Kentucky Backyard Beekeepers have greatly expanded our activities at the Grant County Fair.
    From just a few honey entries, we’ve offered a full honey show with categories in various grades of honey, hive products, food, art and crafts.

  • Skydiving was on my bucket list. It’s number 56, in fact. I kind of had it penciled in for the summer of 2015, and then my best friend turned 40 and decided that’s what he wanted to do to celebrate. BINGO!
    Weeks leading up to the event I was pure bottled excitement and eager anticipation.
    As the day drew closer, I started to feel my excitement turn slightly to nervousness and the night before, I was progressively overcome by sheer, paralyzing terror.

  • As former Judge Executive of Grant County, I'm thrilled to hear that the Ark Encounter had an excellent first year and that businesses that cater to Ark tourists are booming. I hope to be seeing additional hotels and restaurants being built in Williamstown and then watching the kind of economic benefits that Dry Ridge, with its many tourism amenities, has been experiencing.
    I'm also happy to know that as a result of the Ark's financial success, the tax burden on Grant Countians will be lessened.

  • Grant County, thank you!
    The Grant County News has allowed me the opportunity to write about the tremendous success of the Ark Encounter now that it’s been open one year.
    Media from all over the world have toured this massive ship, and we have appreciated all the extensive global coverage—including the fair and accurate reporting of this newspaper.

  • Over 200 years ago, our founding fathers put their lives on the line to create a new country in which freedom reigned. These men had a vision of a nation unafraid to face its enemies and win. We, the people of the United States, have faced insurmountable odds since our young country’s conception but continue to fight for our God-given rights unique to the United States of America.

  • The Williamstown Family Fun Park would like to extend our thanks to the Grant County Chamber businesses who attended our “Business After Hours” event on Tuesday, June 26.  
    It was a beautiful evening with temperatures in the 70s.  We were excited to be able to showcase our family friendly activities to chamber members and their families, including mini golf, zipline tours, chutes and ladders (kids’ adventures course) and our newest offering, archery tag.

  • My father, Donald Pennington, has exemplified what it means to be a Christian man, husband, brother, son, and father every day of my life. I have never seen him waver. The strength and conviction of his character inspires those around him to be better themselves.
    I have watched him lead our immediate (and extended family at times) spiritually. I have seen him confidently assume leadership roles in church my whole life. He is always smiling and laughing. His countenance creates joy in every person he encounters. You just feel better after being around my father.

  • Epperson outraged at suicide
    I am so outraged about the little 8-year-old boy who attended Carson Elementary School in Ohio. He was attacked and left to die on the floor. What does it take today for our children to be safe?
    I am outraged for the mother who is suffering from the loss of her child.  She will feel the pain for a long time. What right did these animals have to take the life of her son?
    This incident is as bad as Sandy Hook was. I am ashamed to be an American today. These animals need to be severely punished. These animals are not children.

  • Sometimes there is just no explanation for why things happen the way they do.  And sometimes there is absolutely no explanation as to how we respond to those happenings, no matter how ridiculous the scenario.  One morning last week I thought I would have a nice relaxing day preparing for my granddaughter’s graduation that evening. 
    As many of you know our granddaughter, Lyndi, had finally been able to come home in February from the hospital after several months due to a chronic illness. 

  • If you’re a fan of snowball fights, sledding or cold nights sitting by a warm fire, the winter of 2016-2017 was not a good one for you.
    If you’re a tick or a mosquito, the mild winter and a wet spring has led to a significant bump in your activity.
    If you’re a bat, it’s unclear yet how the mild winter will impact your activity this summer. Experts think it will lead to a shift in the population, but they aren’t sure if that shift will go up or down.