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Opinion

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    By Rachel Dawn

  • As winter is full swing, remember fire and carbon monoxide poisoning are real concerns that come with staying warm.
    According to the National Fire Protection Association, between 2009 and 2013, U.S. fire departments responded each year to an average of 56,000 home structure fires that involved heating equipment. Space heaters are the most common type of heating equipment involved in home fires, accounting for 40 percent of all fires and more importantly, 84 percent of non-firefighter deaths.

  • Spring break from teaching at U of L falls conveniently during the week of St. Patrick’s Day, which is also my target date for planting onions and potatoes.  I typically manage a mid-March planting but the condition of the soil is my primary concern.  I will not start digging until the soil dries out and is considered workable.
    While we wait for that, select potato varieties that complement the way you cook.  The most versatile varieties include favorites like Yukon Gold and Red Cloud.  

  • Many have asked why the mayor of Dry Ridge has become so involved and outspoken about the situation plaguing the fiscal court.
    It seems the county’s solution to fix a revenue shortfall is to levy a payroll tax on the backs of its workforce. And since some of the largest employers in the county are located within my city, it’s my obligation to stand up and fight for each and every employee in the city.

  • This edition of the newsletter focuses on dog-dog interaction, how it develops into aggression, preventative measures and steps that can help solve the problem once it’s in place.
    Dog-dog aggression has two major root causes:
    1) Negative interaction with other dogs, especially at a young age, and/or 2) a lack of proper early socialization with other dogs. A genetic predisposition toward aggression can also be a strong contributing factor; however, a puppy’s early experiences will have a great influence on how this predisposition is played out.

  • Fiscal court, you can’t defend your incompetency with more incompetency.
    When asked why you didn’t see the budgetary problems coming you can’t defend yourself by just saying you didn’t want to raise taxes last year.
    Your job is to raise taxes if by doing so you are acting in the best interest of the county.

  • Our nation experienced a wonderful American political tradition, as we witnessed the peaceful transfer of executive power. The new president assumed office riding a wave of voter enthusiasm not seen since Reagan.
    For an accurate barometer of that enthusiasm, one should look beyond even the popular vote totals and the Electoral College. The Republican Party now holds 33 governor’s offices, 32 State Legislatures and has control of both legislative branches and the governorship in 24 states.

  • We’ve just come through a brutal election that seems to have lasted at least two years.
    An election deemed as, “... the most important election of our lifetime,” by the Rev. Franklin Graham on the billygraham.org website.
    “Whomever we elect will take the helm of a nation that has grown increasingly hostile and intolerant of the very foundation and principles upon which it was so nobly founded—the Christian faith and biblical values,” Graham said in a September 2016 article.

  • When the magistrates and I took office nearly two years ago, none among us could have predicted or planned for some of the issues we would confront. Now, to be perfectly honest, we all know that taking office as an all new court would bring some degree to strain as each of us would bring to the jobs new ideas and fresh approaches to addressing lingering issues.
    Little did we know what was on the horizon.

  • Some of you may be wondering why you received a Grant County News in the mail this week.
    Well, this week is our annual sample copy of the newspaper that is delivered to all Grant County residents for free. Why do we do this?
    Simply put, we want to show those who are not current subscribers or who do not regularly pick up the paper on the newsstands each week what we have to offer.

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    Recently, I spent an entire day at the Ark Encounter interviewing visitors.  It was a day coordinated with a representative of Answers in Genesis, the Ark’s owner.  As people exited the Ark, I was encouraged by their responses to what they had just experienced.  So many of them were curious about the people in Williamstown and how the Ark is changing our world, so they made it easy for us to talk.

  • I’d like to say first this is the most important election in recent times. 
    It is disgusting when only 30 percent voted last year and look who we ended up with as governor.  There is going to be a lot of out-of-state money coming in to influence the outcome of this election.  The working and middle class are going to be most affected by this election so get out and vote.
    I’m supporting Mayor Jim Gray for U.S. Senate because he is a proven leader. 

  • By Rachel Dawn
    Sherman Mt Zion Road. That’s where the Penningtons live. All of them. Well, we used to.
    My father, Donald Pennington, has six brothers and sisters, and I remember a time in my life when every single one of them and their families lived on our road.
    We lived in the white brick house on the curve from the time I was born till the time I graduated high school and moved to Cincinnati. My parents sold the white brick house that Fall of 2003. They moved exactly one quarter mile down the road to the old red brick farmhouse that was my father’s childhood home.

  • By Misty
    Middelton, Williamstown Superintendent

  • By Jeneen Wiche, Weekend Gardener

  • By Jeneen Wiche, weekend gardener

  • By Rachel Price

  • As the duly elected Grant County Jailer, I am charged by law with staffing the jail and organizing a command staff for efficient operations of the facility.
    I proposed an organizational chart on Oct. 12, 2015 that would have cut $25,000 from the current payroll budget. 
    This would have allowed me to possibly hire an additional deputy and reorganize the command structure underneath my supervision.
     I am a retired law enforcement officer and my organizational structure was modeled on the standard law enforcement command chart.  

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    Five years ago, I met a man who I knew then would forever hold a place in my heart. I knew then that this man was crazy and wild but kind and caring as well. As time went by, this man became my father in so many ways.