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Today's Opinions

  • Blame it on the rain!

    Summer in Kentucky means it is hot, sticky and humid. I’m not particularly fond of either of the three but this summer is different.

    Experts say you can blame it on El Nino, or a period of warm seas that lasts for about three months.

    I’m mad at that El Nino because it’s his fault the tomatoes were late getting ripe.

  • Observations from the side of the road

    When my car started to shiver, I knew I was in trouble.

    I don’t have a good history with cars, blowing transmissions in my previous two cars. This time, I was heading south on U.S. 25 and felt the car shake. I was hoping that I could get the car back to Dry Ridge, but halfway up a hill, it stopped and I blocked the entire lane.

    In these situations, a person can learn a lot about themselves and about the people around them.

  • Trooper Island gives children a chance

    Dear Kentucky State Trooper; this column allows Ken Stone one of the following: free roll through stop sign; speeding up to 40 miles over the limit; or one free hand gesturing road rage incident involving others lack of ability to merge.

    I’m hoping that the trooper will only read the paragraph above, say, “OK” and send me on my way. Let me explain why I should receive the above, and possibly you too.

  • Tales from an intern

    Ferris Bueller said, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

    I’ve seen that come true this summer. The only way I can think to write my last column is to stop, look around and share a few ‘snapshots’ from my internship with you.

    My first week as an intern I was assigned an economy story. Jamie told me to see what I could get out of locals dealing with the economy and how it’s affecting them personally.

  • Amazing youth bring change to county

    Some people simply amaze me.

    People who drive 20 miles under the speed limit while traffic backs up for miles.

    Celebrities who believe their political opinion means more than anyone else who has a vote.

    Parents who do not care to pay enough attention to their kids and their safety.

    The list of my pet peeves is endless.

    However, two weeks ago I witnessed acts of kindness all over Grant County that amazed me in a positive way more than anything I’ve seen in awhile.

  • This is an American issue

    When people seek to exploit economic, social, or other ills for purely political purposes the result is inevitably a skewed, oversimplified analysis of the problem, its causes and potential solutions. Such was the case with a recent column that contemptuously mocked the efforts of conservatives – republicans, democrats, and independents alike – to stem the rapidly rising tide of government intervention, control and spending.

  • Gone, but not forgotten

    Grant County lost two lovely ladies last week.

    Miss Della Jones and Mrs. Geneva (Mam-maw) Hutchison were a lot a like.

    Miss Della, Grant County’s oldest resident at 106, was a joy to be around. She had the most beautiful smile that managed to light up her dark eyes. She was soft spoken and genteel, but when she did speak, her words carried a lot of wisdom and thought.

    I first met Miss Della when she turned 100. That interview was one I’ll never forget because she was such a character. I spent an enjoyable afternoon talking with her about her life.

  • What really was said

    I usually do not answer a squeaky wheel, but when one complains about a “ludicrous mix of disinformation, misinformation” and then uses the press to mislead the public, I just can’t help but to get out the can of oil. Bill Adkins’ rants about the Tea Party in last week’s Grant County News and like any good liberal, he uses smoke screens in the form of attacks on the previous administration to hide the devastating policies of the current liberal administration.