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Today's Opinions

  • Celebrating America on Constitution Week

    The week of Sept.17 through Sept. 23 is recognized as Constitution Week.
    The Constitution was written in the same Pennsylvania Statehouse where the Declaration of Independence was signed and George Washington received his commission as commander of the Continental Army. It’s now called Independence Hall.
    Written in 1787, the Constitution was signed on Sept. 17, but it wasn’t until 1788 that it was ratified by the necessary nine states. Also of the written National Constitutions, the U.S. Constitution is the oldest and shortest.

  • Op-ed: Saving Kentucky’s retirement systems

    Kentucky’s pension systems are in critical condition. While certain state retirement plans are arguably in “better shape” than others are, every system is severely underfunded and rapidly spiraling downward towards a single outcome: no more money to pay Kentucky’s retirees.
    Understandably, retirees and those nearing retirement are concerned. Over the past 10 years, Kentucky’s pension systems have lost more than $7 billion in value.

  • Immunizations remain important part of back-to school routine

    One of the toughest things a parent will do is send their child to college. I have done it twice and still find myself worrying: Are they eating enough? Meeting new friends? Finding time to study?
    Fortunately, parents today have much less to stress about when it comes to their children’s health. Thanks to modern medicine and immunizations, we no longer live in fear of many serious illnesses that once posed massive threats.

  • Boat renewals require valid Hull Identification Numbers

    As your county clerk, I am trying to spread the message out about invalid Hull Identification Numbers (HIN) for boats and/or watercraft throughout our county.

  • Raising taxes to fund pensions is not a good option
  • Ham looks forward to continuing to work with Dry Ridge, Williamstown

    I was encouraged to read the article in the Aug.17 issue of the Grant County News reporting that Dry Ridge continues to boom due to Ark Encounter tourism, and that much-needed hotels and restaurants are being built there. Meanwhile, business leaders all over northern Kentucky are using words like “phenomenal” to describe the impact the Ark and our sister attraction the Creation Museum are having on the regional economy.
    If you happen to own one of the hundreds of hotels in Northern Kentucky, Lexington/Georgetown and even parts of Cincinnati, you are happy.

  • The City of Williamstown supports the Ark Encounter

    I have worked closely with the Ark Encounter since Answers in Genesis announced the project in December of 2010.  Because of my work for the Ark Encounter, I was granted the privilege of cutting the ribbon at the opening ceremony.  As I stated then, we have had our issues and debates on how things should be, but we always work them out in a professional manner.  I think the safety assessment fee controversy has been the first issue to receive this much media attention.

  • Developing Kentucky’s workforce

    From the beginning of our administration, we have set the goal of making Kentucky the engineering and manufacturing hub of excellence in the world. We are off to a good start. We recently shattered our annual record for new economic development projects and we did so in only the first five months of 2017.  
    Many factors weigh into the decisions of businesses to expand or locate their facilities in our state. However, every business leader I meet with emphasizes the quality of our workforce as one of their most critical considerations.