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Columns

  • PERSONALLY SPEAKING

    Growing up, Halloween was pretty much the same every year.
    Put on that year’s costume (each year, they got less cutesy and progressively scary).
    Grab a bag that my dad got from his work and hit the streets looking for good candy.
    I was always picky about my candy so a lot of it would either go to my older brother or my parents.
    My mom loves the Smarties while my dad enjoyed butterscotch and other hard candies.
    I personally loved the taffy type of candy with some occasional chocolate.

  • PERSONALLY SPEAKING

    n, my fiancé Jessica Purnell and I decided we would be our two favorite mascots of the Cincinnati Reds, Rosie and Mr. Redlegs for Halloween.
    What was easy for us was that we already had jersey tops for our costumes, so the remainder of our outfits was going to either be handmade or bought at a sporting goods store.

  • Furnish sisters: gentle ladies, farmers

    Furnish sisters: gentle ladies, farmers

    A line from an Irish blessing bids, “May you always have work for your hands to do.” No one would agree with that more than Frances Furnish and her sister, Eileen, who have spent a good part of their lives as farmers.
    A resident of Grant Manor Care and Rehabilitation Center in Williamstown for the past two years, Frances recently won the Sunbridge Healthcare Art from the Heart contest with her “Sun Bonnet Sue” hand sewn quilt.

  • Veteran information wanted

    The editorial team at the Grant County News works on a lot of special projects, which are above and beyond the normal weekly coverage provided in the Grant County News and Grant County Express.
    We’ve put together special sections that contained a 24/7 look at Grant County which was chock full of photos from a 24-hour period in our community. We’ve also put together specialty sections such as one on the horse community, one on 4-H and an annual one devoted to inside our schools.

  • Bullseye: My first try at a shooting range

    I have never been one to play with toy guns or even shoot a real gun.
    That was until I went to my friend, Kyle Swadener’s bachelor party on Sept. 24.
    The original plan was for us to go shoot paintballs, but just a week before the party, I found out we were going to a shooting range.
    I was a little nervous about shooting a gun, because that is not my kind of thing. I had never held a real gun until I was in front of the shooting target that day.

  • Our business helps your business

    Watching Dennis Kenner work his marketing plan for Bluegrass Tobacco may be comparable to having watched Vaughn Bode put life to his art. He does it so well.

    Last week at his Bluegrass Tobacco shop on North Main in Williamstown, Kenner hosted one in a series of fine cigar parties. The concept of such an event is, in itself, a great marketing concept.

  • Ice cream social was sweet treat

    In a day when our world is topsy-turvy, it was nice to step back into a simpler time and enjoy an old fashioned ice cream social at the William Arnold Log Cabin in Williamstown on Sept. 16.

    The event was a joint effort by the Williamstown Downtown Merchants Association and the Grant County Historical Society.

    Having worked all day and gone directly to snap some photographs for the News, it didn’t take long for me to get hungry, smelling hotdogs on the grill.

  • Family’s loss is heaven’s gain

    I’ve written about my Aunt Lucy many times because she’s been such an important and influential person in my life, but one of the other special women who had a profound impact on me never got much ink.

    Two weeks ago, our family had to say goodbye to Opal Smoot Hawkins. Opal was also my aunt. One of my mom’s older sisters.  Since my mom is the baby of the 12 Smoot children, all of them are older.

  • Not an ordinary Tuesday

    I remember 9/11/01. It was a typical Tuesday at the News office. We were working on finishing up stories and laying out pages for that week’s edition of the Grant County News.

    I was on the phone with our printing plant in Cynthiana. The production coordinator there said, “Oh my gosh, we’ve been attacked.” I couldn’t comprehend what she was saying so I asked her to repeat herself.

    “America, we’ve been attacked,” she said. “Aren’t you watching the news on TV?”

  • ‘A day that will live in infamy’

    Growing up, I was always told about Pearl Harbor and what a tragic day that was for Americans, as nearly 3,000 people were killed on Dec. 7, 1941.

    Flashback to Sept. 11, 2001, I witnessed on television a new horror as two planes struck the World Trade Center, a plane flew into the Pentagon and one crashed in a field in Shanksville, Pa.

    I was also told you will never forget where you were.