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Columns

  • Who drank the Kool-Aid?

    In November 1978, a group of true believers were led to their deaths in the forests of Guyana which is located near Venezuela on the eastern side of Latin America.  Their deaths were orchestrated by a religious leader who urged his followers to commit the “’revolutionary act’ of suicide.”  

  • A picture is worth a 1,000 words

     

  • Soccer is a cruel game

    Sunday around 5:30pm, feeling as patriotic as I ever felt, I got dressed up in all of the red, white, and blue apparel I could muster up from my wardrobe, grabbed our American flag, and ran around and out of my house waving the flag as I got myself, and as many other people as I could, pumped up for the U.S.’s match against arguably the best player in the world. Little did I know what would transpire in the next two hours would leave me feeling almost every emotion in the book.

  • Sgt. Paul Gordon, 19

    Sgt. Paul Marshall Gordon, 19, of Grant County, died June 30, 1951 while a prisoner of war at the Suan Village Camp in North Korea.  
    In late January, 1951, Sgt. Gordon was taken prisoner after engaging with enemy troops in the Wonju Province of South Korea.  Sgt. Gordon served with the U.S. Army, H Company, 2nd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment.
    He was the son of the late Doll and Urie Gordon.

  • Taking care of the future

    Recently my daughter and I went to a Build-A-Bear workshop at the Dry Ridge Fire Department. This event benefitted Shriner’s Hospital in Cincinnati and Shriner’s Hospital in Lexington.
     I explained to my daughter that she was going to make bears for sick children in the hospital.
    Shriner’s Hospital has always been dear to me for several reasons. The hospital gives care to children without regard to race, color, creed, disability, national origin or ability of a patient or family to pay. They care for them because they need it.

  • Paint the Town was a success!

    It’s hard to believe that winter finally seems to have moved on and spring has finally sprung. It was a long-time coming, but now that the weather has turned warmer the days are flying by.
    April is nearly over and it feels like the calendar page just turned.
    I was most impressed with this year’s observance of Child Abuse Prevention Month. The Grant County School District made a concerted effort to take their message to the public with a Blue Ribbon/Pinwheel Decorating Contest and a community breakfast held at Grant County High School on April 9.

  • Critical week ends with budget bill

    This was a critical week as we continued to hash out state budget details with the House in a conference committee after passing our versions of the budget bills.  
    There are many different opinions and philosophies on how to spend the money, raise revenue and support the important public services for Kentucky.  The budget is the ultimate statement of priorities for the Commonwealth.

  • Welcome to this crazy world

    The birth of a child is always a joyous occasion. Some of my family were expecting their first child. A baby girl. Oh what fun. Girls are always more fun than boys.
    Personal opinion.
    Dressing them up in little bows and big frilly dresses.
    Maybe it’s because I have a daughter.
    In helping them prepare for her, I was reminded of just how out of the loop I really was. Talk about feeling like a fish out of water, it had been eight years since I shopped in depth for anything baby.

  • Snow kidding- Is it spring yet?

    Even as a child I didn’t like to be teased, at least not much.
    Good-natured ribbing is OK, but I certainly don’t like to be teased like we were over the weekend.
    Bright sunshine and temperatures in the 50s and 60s – that was a cruel tease.
    I mean is anyone besides me ready for some warm spring weather?
    Typically, I don’t mind winter and I don’t mind snow. Ice is another story, but snow is pretty. I like the way it blankets everything in a coat of winter white, but this year it just goes on and on and on.

  • Recognizing history as session continues

    The Senate continued work and recognized an historic event. Many lawmakers joined thousands of Kentuckians gathered along Capitol Avenue to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Frankfort led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  It was a cold and blustery March 5, 1964, when Dr. King, along with 10,000 others, marched up to the front door of our capital in support of the Kentucky Civil Rights Act.