.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Woodyard, boy, Nov. 27, 2010

    Travis and Tisha Woodyard, of Dry Ridge, are proud to announce the birth of their son, Easton James Woodyard.

    Easton was born at 4:13 a.m. Nov. 27, 2010 at St. Elizabeth Medical Center South in Edgewood.

    He weighed 9 pounds and 6 ounces and was 22 inches long.

  • Jail employees recognized for life-saving duties

    What started with a routine head count at the Grant County Detention Center led to an emergency surgery for an inmate that likely saved his life.

    Three jail employees were honored June 2 for the actions they took in early January to make sure an inmate who had a history of pneumonia and a collapsed lung received the medical attention he needed.

  • Saylor wins 8th region KHSAA sportsmanship award

    It was surprising news for Rebecca Saylor, when she received word from Grant County High School athletic director Scott Shipp, that she had won the 8th Region KHSAA Sportsmanship Award.

    “I said are you kidding me,” she said to Shipp. “I was super excited.”

  • Archery gets new ranges at Lloyd Wildlife

    It was five years in the making, but the archery range at Lloyd Wildlife Management Area in Crittenden is open to the public.

    The range is a partnership among Earl Gossett, president of the Northern Kentucky Bowhunters Association, Roy Grimes, the director of the National Archery in Schools program and John Gassett, the commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  • Coroner settles into new role

    Bob McDaniel’s first few months as Grant County coroner have been busy. He’s been called to nearly two dozen death scenes, the majority of them where someone died of natural causes.

    To date, he’s had only a couple of fatality accidents that he’s had to investigate.

  • Federal inmates to return to jail?

    Grant County Detention Center Jailer Terry Peeples looked for ways to cut costs and raise revenues for the 2011-12 budget.

    However, one thing that is not in the budget is revenue from federal prisoners.

    Peeples said he hopes a change in medical contracts will eventually lead to discussion with U.S. Marshals about bringing back needed dollars from housing and transporting federal prisoners.

    The jail currently contracts medical services with Southern Health Partners during the day.

  • Corinth cable meeting set

    Williamstown is offering free standard installation to the primary outlet for the first 150 Corinth customers to sign up for both cable and Internet service.

    An informational meeting concerning the expansion of Williamstown Cable to Corinth is planned for 7 p.m. June 16 at the Corinth Community Center.

    For more information call Corith Mayor Billy Hill at 859-824-5922.

  • Banana car roars through country on a mission

    No, you’re not seeing things. You really did see a Big Banana Car in downtown Dry Ridge this week.

    Steve Braithwaite, of Coopersville, Pa., pealed into town in a four-passenger banana shaped car and  ended up at Dry Ridge Auto Parts to get directions to the I-75 Camper Village where they planned to spend the night.

  • Pa. woman dies in I-75 wreck

    A Pennsylvania woman died following a crash on Interstate-75 on Friday, June 10.

    The accident occurred at 4:45 p.m. in the northbound lanes near the 162-mile marker between Dry Ridge and Crittenden.

    Amber Elizabeth Colvin, 32, of Carlisle, Pa. was pronounced dead at the scene by Grant County Coroner Robert McDaniel.

    McDaniel said Colvin was wearing a seat belt and her vehicle’s air bag did deploy, but the majority of the damage to her 2002 Ford SUV was on the driver’s side causing multiple trauma.

  • BUDGET WOES

    Dry Ridge Mayor Clay Crupper said he had to “cut down to the bone” in the 2011-12 budget.

    The city council approved the second reading of the budget during its June 6 meeting.

    The budget included $1.66 million in general fund appropriations, $104,950 less than current year’s budget.

    “It’s going to be awfully tight,” Crupper said. “We couldn’t give any raises. We couldn’t do nothing.”