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Today's News

  • Family hides in closet

    Kelley Crook was at home with her husband and four children when the tornado smashed into their neighborhood.

    Crook, a nurse who works third shift, was sleeping when her youngest child awakened her up about 4 p.m.

    “My husband looked out and yelled for us to go to the basement,

    “The wind was whistling and I wasn’t sure what was going on,” she said.

    The family crowded into a closet under a set of stairs.

  • Deputy watches ‘ugly sky‘

    As a deputy with the Grant County Sheriff’s Department, Andy Reeves has seen his share of sights, but March 2 he saw something he’d never seen before.

    Reeves, a resident of Ky. 491 in Crittenden, said he saw the funnel cloud pass his house.

    “The sky was this ugly, weird color,” he said. “It turned green. Everything else had been cloudy and blue, but you could see this coming.”

    Reeves said he and his wife went to their basement, into their lower level garage, inside their truck and waited.

  • Woman takes refuge in basement

    Linda Jefferson rode out the tornado in her basement.

    “I heard the sirens and went down right way,” she said.

    From her basement window, Jefferson saw the tornado rip the next door neighbor’s garage door off.

    “It was like it was just a toy,” she said.

    Jefferson’s home suffered minor damage. She lost a small tree in her front yard and shingles from her roof.

  • ‘We can count our blessings’

    Todd Henage is counting his blessings.

    “It’s a miracle,” he said, standing on the sidewalk on Barley Circle on March 3, the day after deadly tornadoes ravaged Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio.

    Henage owns one of the duplexes in Harvesters Subdivision. Half of it was destroyed.

    He said he watched weather reports on Friday and was nervous about what he saw.

    “I’ve never been scared of a storm, but I’ll tell you this one made me antsy and I went to the basement.

  • Thayer gets bird’s-eye view of tornado damage

    Sen. Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, received a bird’s eye view of the damage caused by tornadoes in Grant County and other parts of Kentucky.

    Once he learned of the damage in Crittenden and Piner, Thayer contacted Gov. Steve Beshear’s office.

    He subsequently was invited to fly in a Kentucky National Guard Black Hawk helicopter Saturday as the governor assessed storm damage across the state.

    They first landed in West Liberty in Morgan County, which Thayer said was without a doubt the hardest hit area in the state.

  • Red Cross opens temporary shelter

    As quickly as the tornado devastated Crittenden, the Grant County chapter of the American Red Cross mobilized to help those in need.

    Once Diana Morgan, local coordinator of the American Red Cross, received a call from the Kentucky State Police and Grant County Emergency Management that assistance was needed, she immediately contacted the Cincinnati office and began setting up a shelter at Grant County High School.

  • STATE OF THE CITY

    Williamstown is in a strong financial position, thanks to past mayors and city councils that developed and expanded our utilities.  While financially sound, I realize, as mayor, that we must watch all expenses in this tough economic time. What’s been going on during the last year?

  • What can you learn from your toothbrush?

    I never gave much thought to my toothbrush before.
    Every morning and night when I go to brush my teeth, it’s always sitting in the ceramic floral cup on the left hand side of my vanity next to the hand soap.
    Others may keep items like this on the right side of the vanity but since my husband and I are both lefties, we probably do things backwards.
    My dentist always gives me a new toothbrush when I go in for my six-month checkup.

  • Beware of scams following disaster

    Unfortunately there are many unscrupulous businesses who crawl out of the woodwork after a disaster such as the one in Crittenden last week.
    They look to prey on people who are down on their luck and those who have been through tough and trying circumstances.
    Not all of these businesses are bad, but it’s wise to check out a contractor’s references and to read the fine print before hiring them to do a job.

  • Time to plan is before siren sounds

    The tornado that swept through Crittenden on March 2 should teach us all that an emergency plan is a must-have for every family.
    Grant County Emergency Management Director Rick Willoby made an excellent point in his observations on storm preparedness.
    “You can’t wait until a siren blows to get a plan,” Willoby said. See related story in this issue.
    He urged residents to prepare a “go-bag,” meaning one that you can grab and go in a moment’s notice.