.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Tearful end to the season

    March Madness came and went in a hurry for the Grant County Braves as they fell victim to Oldham County 65-33, March 1, in the 8th Region Tournament at Henry County High School.

    The Braves sat silent for the hour-long bus ride to the game, by the request of coach Jim Hicks. He wanted them to focus on the game.

    “A big game like this, the boys were ready to play and we had fresh legs going into the game,” Hicks said.

  • Was God punishing us?

    Scripture Verse:
    Now there were some present at that time who told Jesus about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mixed with their sacrifices. Jesus answered, “Do you think that these Galileans were worse sinners than all the other Galileans because they suffered this way? I tell you, no! But unless you repent, you too will all perish. Or those eighteen who died when the tower in Siloam fell on them-do you think they were more guilty than all the others living in Jerusalem? I tell you, no! But unless you repent, you too will all perish.”

  • Church Notes 3.8.12

    Christ Community
    • Rhonda’s challenge was to continually trust, continually pray, continually praise and have continual peace and safety. If people have little time to pray, they have little power to trust. Where the presence of God is, the great peace of God is.
    • March 11 - Annual Business Meeting. No church that evening. For more information, call 859-394-2586.

    Corinth Christian

  • TURNING BACK THE CLOCK 3.8.12

    Mar. 6, 1997

    Allison Spiess has been appointed as an agent in the Grant County Farm Bureau Insurance Agency. She is a graduate of Wauseon High School and holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Morehead State University. In her new position, she will be calling on the residents of Grant County to offer a wide variety of insurance coverage through the Farm Bureau Insurance Companies.

  • Spring peepers welcome us back

    Absolutely nothing says spring more than the distant chorus of spring peepers. There is a wooded stream just off Conner Station that is home to a cacophonous band of peepers all competing for as many females as they can.  On a warm March evening, especially after a shower, spring peepers remind me of how glorious rural life can be.

    Just by listening a whole other world can be imagined.

  • COUNTY’S PLAN WORKS

    Rick Willoby, Grant County’s director of Emergency Management, has a plan and when a tornado hit Grant County March 2, the plan went into action.

    But he wonders how many Grant County residents have a plan in case of a disaster.

    “You can’t wait until a siren blows to get a plan,” Willoby said. “This time of year is just the start of severe storm weather and you’ve got to know where you’re going to go and how you can check in with others after it’s over.”

  • Crittenden chief steps up to handle disaster

    Lee Burton handles yet another phone call.

    He’s calm, polite and efficient.

    He makes notes on a yellow legal pad. He’s being asked to coordinate a shot clinic.

    His office door opens and another note is shoved at him.

    He picks up a large mug of coffee and takes a sip, as he looks around his small office inside the Crittenden Fire House.

    It’s been a long two days, but the dark shadows under his eyes are the only signs he’s not slept since a tornado ripped through his town.

  • Monetary donations requested

    Stacks of clothing, canned goods and bottled water sit inside the Crittenden Baptist Church, Crittenden Christian Church and Crittenden Fire House.

    The public responded so well to the call for help in the wake of the tornado on March 2, that relief coordinators are saying they’ve run out of room to store the public’s generosity.

    “We’re no longer accepting donations because we’ve simply run out of room for them,” said Crittenden Fire Chief Lee Burton.

  • ‘I feel lucky’

    Connie Serra heard a roar and then her Crittenden Court apartment started to shake.

    “I heard a big noise and then it got dark and that’s when I said, ‘let’s get in the bathroom,’” Serra said, Saturday morning as she surveyed the damage in her neighborhood.

    Serra said her front window blew out and her roof came off, allowing water from the upstairs apartment to seep into her home.

    “This is a mess,” she said. “I feel sad. This is just terrible.”

  • Truck weathers storm

    Doug Bowling weathered last Friday’s storm in his truck.

    He was trying to reach his home in Harvester’s when the tornado hit.

    “It started bashing into my truck,” he said.

    Bowling said roofs were blowing off all around him, but once he traveled about 500 feet further, it was simply raining.

    “I’ve never seen anything like this,” he said.