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Today's News

  • Grant County 4-H members honored at Boone County banquet

    Grant County 4-H members were all honored at the horse banquet at the Boone County Extension office on Jan. 22 - Pictured left to right, those recognized were:
    • Mikayla Bowen -  Top Ten State 4-H Horse Show
    • Karyna Davis - District 4-H Horse Show Participants
    • Mycah Woosley -  District 3 4-H Horse Show Reserve High Point Division 1
    • Payton O’Neill - Top Ten State 4-H Horse Show
    • Cathy Davis -  Grant County 4-H Club Horse Leader

  • Another Place In Time 2-17-11

     

    Welcome to a new Another Place in Time photo. If you know the people in this photo or where it was taken, call the Grant County News office at 824-3343 and share your guesses with us.

  • Special Valentines

    I would like to nominate my son-in-law as my special valentine. Estell Hatter is a husband and father and housekeeper. He is disabled because of epilsepsy.

    His wife, Melissa, brings in their only income so he babysits his three daughters who are in school, plus a 4-year-old son and a 1 ½-year-old little boy. Estell also looks after his 19-year-old son who is slightly mentally challenged.

  • Local Angus breeder recognized for proven bulls

    Layle E. Lonkard, of Williamstown, owns one bull listed in the Spring 2011 Sire Evaluation Report published by the American Angus Association® in Saint Joseph, Mo. National Cattle Evaluation (NCE) expected progeny differences (EPDs) are now generated on a weekly basis; however a biannual report is still printed. Issued in both the spring and fall, the Sire Evaluation Report features the latest performance information available on 4,765 sires, and is currently accessible at www.angus.org.

  • Lawrence joins American Angus Association

    Troy D. Lawrence of Dry Ridge is a new member of the American Angus Association®, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.
    The American Angus Association, with nearly 30,000 active adult and junior members, is the largest beef breed association in the world. Its computerized records include detailed information on more than 19 million registered Angus.

  • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

    The Senate focused on promoting energy and election legislation that did not make it into law during last year’s session of the General Assembly, as well as introducing new legislation focusing on horse racing, child care safety and the state pension system.

  • Special Valentines

    My special Valentine is George, my inspiration to keep going and live each day to the fullest. He is my husband, my companion and my rock when obstacles and challenges seem they can never be resolved.

    Although, he is permanently disabled, he is the one person I can count on to bring a smile to my face and to tell me that the obstacles and challenges can be overcome with a little effort.

    He is in the fifth and final stages of Parkinson’s disease.

  • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

    The House passed several bills that have been at the top of our agenda for this session.
    House Bill 305 is considered our budget adjustment bill that will help address the state’s Medicaid shortfall. Specifically it would move $166.6 million from next year’s Medicaid budget to this year’s budget. House Bill 305 passed by a vote of 80-19 and now heads to the Senate for consideration.

  • Health dept. faces cuts

    The Northern Kentucky District Health Department, which includes Grant County, is facing a $1.3 million budget deficit.

    Proposals to fix the budget include laying off 17 district employees, furlough days and no raises. Officials are unsure how the budget shortfall will impact the health department’s programs.

    Seventeen employees of the Northern Kentucky Health Department may be out of a job due to budget cuts and it’s unsure if programs will be impacted by a budget deficit.

  • Pothole problem gets drivers’ attention

    As snow and ice melt, cautious drivers have to deal with another road worry — the dreaded pothole.

    Potholes, small and crater-like, litter Interstate 75 and city and county roads providing a treacherous obstacle course for drivers.

    “I believe it is worse this year because of the freezing and thawing we’ve had,” said Ed Gabbert, director of transportation of Williamstown Independent Schools. “It’s all weather-related. We’ve had so many trucks and scrapers out there and that takes a toll on the road, too. It’s just the wear and tear of the road.”