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Today's News

  • Needle exchange begins in Grant

    The Northern Kentucky Health Department’s first-ever needle exchange program will begin March 16 in Grant County.

    The program will initially operate from 1 to 4 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Grant County Health Center at 234 Barnes Rd. in Williamstown.
    The goal of the program, which allows participants to exchange dirty, heroin-tainted syringes for clean needles, is to halt the dramatic rise of hepatitis C cases in northern Kentucky during the heroin epidemic.

  • Improvements attract visitors to Piddle Park

    Brandon Holder used to go to Piddle Park in Dry Ridge all the time with his younger brother.

    “We would go down there when nobody else cared about the field and rake it, pick weeds out of the infield and pickup trash,” Holder said. “In the winter when there was ice on the court, Andrew (Simpson) and I would scrape off the court just so we could shoot basketball.”

  • Corinth Post Office looking for new home

    There is a lot of frustration and confusion around the imminent closure and movement of the Corinth Post Office.

    The reasons for seem to be vague.  
    Some say “package liquor store.”  
    Some say “new bar.”

  • Clever alternatives to traditional dyed Easter eggs

    Easter is a time when Christian families gather to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Religious customs abound on Easter, but a number of secular traditions have emerged as well. Perhaps the most popular secular tradition associated with Easter is the coloring of Easter eggs.

    • Wooden eggs:  Visit a craft store and purchase wooden eggs that can be painted and decorated however you desire. The wooden eggs will be durable and can be stored away for use each and every year.

  • Twenty apply for Williamstown superintendent

    Twenty people have applied to be the next superintendent of the Williamstown Independent School District.

    The district received 20 applications by the March 2 deadline for the position that will be vacant after the current school year.
    Superintendent Sally Skinner recently notified the board that she will be retiring at the end of the school year after more than 40 years in education.

  • Trump wins county’s first presidential caucus

    Donald Trump was the winner in Kentucky and Grant County in the first-ever Republican presidential caucus March 5.

    Statewide, Trump garnered 36 percent of the votes compared to 32 percent for Ted Cruz.
    Marco Rubio (16 percent) and John Kasich (14 percent) were in third and fourth place, respectively.

    Trump carried 78 counties, including Grant, while Cruz received the most votes in 42 counties.
    In Grant County, there were 1,282 Republicans who voted at Williamstown High School in the caucus.

  • Emotions run high at Hiles sentencing

    Family members of victims Larry Whiteker and Nicole Hiles fought through tears March 3 as they gave an emotional plea during the sentencing of murderer Shaun Hiles.
    Hiles was convicted in January of the July 28, 2014 shooting deaths of his estranged wife, Nicole Hiles, and her friend, Larry Whiteker, at Vallandingham and Mulligan roads in Dry Ridge.
    During the trial, Commonwealth Attorney Jim Crawford painted Hiles as an enraged husband, upset over a pending divorce, who had been stalking his wife and Whiteker.

  • Grant now home to Air Evac Lifeteam

    St. Elizabeth Healthcare and Air Evac Lifeteam have joined forces to increase air medical services coverage in Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana with a new base in Grant County.

    An open house and blessing dedication took place March 4 at the hangar off of Barnes Road in Williamstown.

    “This base will ensure even more residents in the region will have access to life-saving medical care,” said John Mitchell, assistant vice president of operations at St. Elizabeth Grant County. “The coverage area extends for a 70-mile radius from Williamstown.”

  • Dr. Seuss is on the loose
  • KSP searches for cold-case homicide ID

    New technological advances could help Kentucky State Police come closer to solving a cold-case homicide from 1989 in Grant County.

    The body of a partially decomposed unidentified white man, who was shot in the head, was found on April 9, 1989, in a tobacco barn off of Taft Highway (KY 22) — around seven miles west of Dry Ridge.
    The unidentified male was 6 feet five inches tall, weighed around 200 pounds and was found nude with both of his hands severed from the body.