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Today's News

  • CMZ staff preps for school with Olympics
  • Grant students head back to school
  • Gov. Bevin launches ‘Message of Hope’ campaign

    Gov. Bevin’s office will begin placing painted rocks around Kentucky in order to raise awareness for Kentucky’s opioid epidemic and the “Don’t Let Them Die” (DLTD) initiative.

    “Though this promotion is intended to be encouraging and fun, it seeks to raise awareness across the Commonwealth about a tragically serious epidemic,” said Amanda Stamper, director of communications. “Last year, 1,404 Kentuckians died as a result of an opioid overdose.

  • How to make an Eclipse Cereal Box Viewer

    Background
    Information:
    A solar eclipse is one of the most exciting celestial events we can observe.
    If you are lucky enough to find yourself along the path of totality, the moon will completely cover the sun allowing you to see the corona, the sun’s atmosphere.

    Outside of the path of totality, you can still enjoy the partial phase of the solar eclipse, but you need to use eye protection and/or an eclipse-viewing device for indirect viewing.

  • Williamstown Woman’s Club needs help to honor veterans

    One American flag flapping in the wind can be moving for most patriotic Americans, but 100 such flags with stars and stripes waving in close proximity can be breathtaking.
    Several years ago, the members of the Williamstown Woman’s Club were looking for ways to make a meaningful difference in the community, and they decided to display 100 American flags along Eibeck Lane for every veteran’s funeral held at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North (KVCN) in Williamstown.

  • Adkins receives full scholarship from KTC

    Luke Adkins, a 2017 graduate of Grant County High School has been selected to receive a full scholarship from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to pursue a degree in civil engineering at Western Kentucky University.

    This scholarship, which was established in 1948, has been awarded to more than 1,800 exceptional students from around the state.

  • Corinth holds off on tobacco-free park resolution

    At the regular meeting on Aug. 14, the Corinth city commissioners Aimee Lingle and Deana Caldwell met with Mayor William R. Hill and Tara Wright at the city building.  
    Commissioners Jeanne Hauk and Barbara New were unable to attend.  
    Items discussed included a tobacco-free park resolution, a tax ordinance and work on Marathon Drive road.
    A proposed resolution creating a policy prohibiting tobacco In city parks had been given to the city by the Northern Kentucky Health Department. This would be a part of the Smoke-Free Kentucky campaign.

  • Clerk’s Office receives $18,000 grant for second consecutive year

    Good fortune struck twice as the Kentucky Department of Libraries and Achieves awarded the Grant County Clerk’s Office an $18,000 grant for the second consecutive year.

  • Indeterminate or determinate?

    I received a letter from a reader years ago that asked somewhat of a philosophical question regarding determinate tomatoes.  Yes, philosophical, because she asked why would we plant a tomato that sets its fruit, reaches a certain point, stops growing, ripens nearly at once and then dies?  
    Our love affair with homegrown tomatoes would more logically dictate that we grew only indeterminate tomatoes that reached monstrous proportions and yielded fruit into a first killing frost.

  • God’s plan is always ‘Plan A’

    Recently, I met a woman who had moved to the area to stay with family after a painful divorce and some health problems on top of that.
    She had lost everything and was starting over.
    “I’m too old for this,” she said, although she didn’t divulge her age.
    She looked to be maybe 40, which isn’t old, but when you’ve lost everything and you’re starting over in a place you really, really, really don’t want to be but feel you have no choice and nowhere else to go, any age is too old, I suppose.