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Today's News

  • GCMS students donate gifts to Northern Kentucky Community Action

    Recently, 37 Grant County Middle School students traveled to Wal-Mart to purchase Christmas gifts for Grant County families who needed help during the holiday season.

  • Fox leads Demons to win over Lloyd

    The Williamstown Demons hosted the Lloyd Memorial Juggernauts on Dec. 17, and defeated the previously undefeated team 67-55.  

    The Demons jumped out to a 13-10 lead after one quarter mainly on the play of Wenzie Fox.  
    Williamstown went inside frequently to the 6’6” post player.  

  • Thoroughbreds rally late to beat Braves

    The Grant County Braves hosted Harrison County on Dec. 16, and lost in overtime 76-74.
    The Braves led by 15 points heading into the fourth quarter but turnovers and poor shooting from the field and free throw line cost them the game down the stretch.

    Another factor in the demise of the Braves was the fouls they committed which resulted in four Braves fouling out.  
    The Braves were without the assistance of both big men for almost the whole fourth quarter.

  • Lady Braves defeat Lady Demons 63-46

    The Grant County Lady Braves defeated the Williamstown Lady Demons 63-46 in the Coaches for Cancer game on Dec.13.

    Grant County’s Lindsay Kinard led her team with 16 points and Bry Ezell followed with 14.
    Justice Chambers led the Lady Demons with 14 points, and Makayla Kennedy followed with 10.
    The Grant County-Williamstown rivalry is nothing new to these schools, as it has been around for many decades.
    Grant County coach Shawn West remembers it well.

  • POLICE REPORTS

    (Editor’s Note: The Grant County News publishes all items in police beat that are submitted from each individual police agency. The News does not omit names from police reports.
    Capt. Dennis Switzer executed a warrant for Todd E. Beckham, 46, of Crittenden, for non-payment of fines, at 10:05 a.m. Dec. 13 on Crittenden Park. Beckham was lodged at the Grant County Detention Center.

  • Christmas reunion story

    I’m a sucker for a reunion story.
    In 2008, I covered the story of a couple who had been married and then divorced for 52 years. They had lost contact with each other until their daughter found her dad through an Internet search. By that time he was seriously ill, but well enough to come to Florida to be reunited with his ex-wife.
    The couple remarried, and the man died less than a month later. It was quite a story.

  • Good tools make great gifts

    Amassing a good set of gardening tools usually takes a while and the holiday season, with various traditions of gift giving, is a perfect time to help gardeners achieve that goal.  Good tools don’t come cheap but if you buy right the first time the investment pays off in the life of the tool and the efficiency of the job.  The right tool often means less time spent on tackling the chore.

  • Make your holidays green

    Often we associate environmental topics with spring time, but you can be environmentally friendly any time of the year. Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, household waste increases by about 25 percent in the United States. The holidays are a great time to reduce your waste and get young people interested in the environment.
    Here are some ways you and your children can reduce your impact on the environment while still enjoying the season and showing loved ones that you care.

  • Early voting is not the answer

    I read with interest recent editorials from various newspapers stating it is too difficult to vote in Kentucky and that the Commonwealth should pass a law allowing “early voting” to increase the number of participants in our state and federal elections. I am always supportive of increased voter turnout; early voting is not the answer.

  • Where are you Christmas? Why can’t I find you?

    “Where are you Christmas?” That is the title and first line of a song by Faith Hill.
    Does that describe you? Unfortunately, for the past few years, that’s how I’ve felt.
    It wasn’t always that way. In fact, in the old days, I started listening to Christmas music in October, followed quickly by five video versions of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.”
    After we moved to Kentucky from Ohio, my mother and sister came for a brief visit shortly before Christmas.