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Today's News

  • Rain, cool temperatures delay harvest season

    More rain, cooler temperatures and overcast conditions spelled trouble for farmers as Hurricanes Harvey and Irma tracked north to Grant County. But inconsistent summer weather also made this a rough season for local farmers and gardeners. 

    Grant County 4-H Extension agent Chris Ammerman said the current weather has “caused farmers a good deal of distress for some harvest seasons.” 

  • Jones hired as newest Williamstown police officer

    Andrew Jones said he always wanted to be a police officer. Now, he is one. 

    A local man, Jones started working as the newest Williamstown officer Sept. 27 having graduated from the police academy the week before. 

    “I just want to be the best police officer I can be and serve the community,” Jones said. 

  • Local schools receive assessment report cards

    Local students proved their proficiency in reading, math and social studies as Kentucky Department of Education released the annual report cards Sept. 28. 

    Williamstown Independent saw improved scores for each school while Grant County Schools saw significant improvements on specific subjects for most of their schools, with some getting closer to an overall proficient rating. 

  • Stage Right’s Rising Stars to present ‘Once Upon a Mattress’

    Stage Right Musical Theatre will once again showcase local youth talent with performances of “Once Upon a Mattress” at Grant County High School on Oct. 6-8.

    The production is based on the classic “The Princess and the Pea” story and features eight students from Williamstown Independent and Grant County school districts.
    Stage Right has previously presented “Seussical, Jr.” last year and “Annie, Jr.” earlier this year as part of its Rising Stars Academy.

  • Courthouse to undergo assessment for possible renovations

    Judge-Executive Steve Wood wants to make much-needed improvements to the deteriorating Grant County Courthouse.
    The laundry list of problems with the courthouse, which was built in 1937, include bathrooms that are not handicapped-accessible, a falling ceiling and bricks coming out of the back wall of the building.
    An addition, which houses the judge-executive’s office, was built in 1976.

  • Williamstown raises property tax rate

    Williamstown City Council passed a property tax hike Sept. 25.
    The council raised the real property tax for 2017-18 to $0.340 per $100 value and personal property to $0.526 per $100 value as a compensating rate, according to the official ordinance.

  • Halloween in the Park set for Oct. 28

    For the second consecutive year, the Grant County News will partner with the City of Dry Ridge for Halloween in the Park.

    The 31st annual event will take place from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Piddle Park in Dry Ridge on Saturday Oct. 28.

    The event will kick off at 3:30 p.m. with pumpkin decorating. The first 200 children will receive a free small pumpkin, provided by Country Pumpkins and paid for by the Grant County Tourism Commission, to decorate and take home.

  • Duke Energy customers to receive smart meters

    Duke Energy is bringing smart meters to Grant County customers.

    Duke Energy announced the switch from walk-by, or traditional meters, to the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) meter starting February 2018 through June 2018 at the Sept. 5 Grant County Fiscal Court meeting. 

  • Enrollment drops for Grant, Williamstown schools

    Student enrollment has dropped for Grant County and Williamstown Independent school districts for the 2017-18 year.

    Grant County Schools’ enrollment dropped 72 students from the 2016-17 school year to the end of this year’s first month.

    District-wide, the enrollment was 3,650 students compared to 3,722 students last year.

  • New online tool demonstrates differences in health across Northern Kentucky

    Your ZIP code may have a larger impact on your health than your genetic code. As part of an analysis of health status across Northern Kentucky communities, the Northern Kentucky Health Department examined a variety of factors that can impact health, including levels of education and income. The results show significant differences in communities, with life expectancy in certain areas almost 10 years higher than others.
    The analysis is part of a larger project to examine health equity in Northern Kentucky.