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Today's News

  • Road dept. land buy, move draws criticism

    The Grant County Road Department will be getting a new home, but not everyone is happy about the move.

    Charlie Phillips, a resident of Mount Zion, attended a recent fiscal court meeting to express his displeasure with the fiscal court’s site selection for the road department on Hopperton Lane in Dry Ridge.

    “I’m not unhappy that they bought property,” he said. “I’m unhappy that they bought property along the expressway which would be good for economic development.”

  • Grant Allstars move to state

    The Grant County 9 and 10-year-old Allstar Team became District 6 Champions after beating the Owen County Allstar Team on July 7.

    The team moves on to the state tournament in Georgetown on July 14, to compete for title of State Champions in their division.

  • North Key honors Detention Center

    David struggled with substance abuse and mental health issues.

    He’d spent a lot of time behind bars and was referred to as “a revolving door client.”

    That is, until he received treatment while in the Grant County Detention Center for his problems through an inmate re-entry project.

    Since March 2009, David is the program’s most successful client. He’s no longer in jail, but is now involved in addiction recovery programs and is going to college.

  • Williamstown enrolls for 2010-2011

    Any parent/guardian wishing to enroll their child in the Williamstown Independent School District as a new student for the 2010-2011 school year may pick up an enrollment packet from the Williamstown Board of Education Office.

    The completed paperwork and required documentation may be returned to the board of education office during regular business hours or returned to the Williamstown Welcome Center during open enrollment from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 8 and July 22 and from 5 to 8 p.m. July 21.

  • Grant natives honored for fundraising at Transylvania

    Two Grant County natives, who are members of Transylvania’s class of 2010, have been recognized for their involvement in the Transylvania Senior Challenge, an effort to raise money to fund an annual scholarship for an incoming student. Caroline Powell and Danielle Smith were a part of the group that pledged a record $22,207 for the fund.

    Transylvania, founded in 1780, is the nation’s 16th oldest institution of higher learning and is consistently ranked in national publications as one of the top liberal arts colleges in the country.

  • Crittenden, fire chief resolve dispute

    The contract dispute between Crittenden City Council and the Crittenden Volunteer Fire Department, which brought the June meeting to a halt, has been resolved.

  • Clark accepted to Kentucky Governor’s School for The Arts

    This summer the Kentucky Center will host over 200 eager young artists from every region of the Commonwealth in the heart of the Bluegrass, as The Kentucky Center Governor’s School for the Arts (GSA) takes place at Lexington’s Transylvania University from June 20 to July 10.

  • For the Record 7-22-10

    Civil Suits

    May 7:

    Barbara Ann Cray vs. Roger Cray, petition for dissolution of marriage

    May 10:

    Green Tree Servicing, LLC vs. Timothy W. Brock, Lisa J. Brock, First Union Home Equity Bank and Beneficial Kentucky, Inc., default of payment on note

    Capital Alliance Financial, LLC vs. Laura Chaney, default of payment on note

  • Courtney explores agriculture career at MSU ag institute

    Nicole Courtney, of Dry Ridge, was chosen,  along with 42 other high school students selected from around the state, to attend the Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders (IFAL), sponsored by Kentucky Farm Bureau.

    The five-day summer leadership conference was held at Murray State University June 13-17, while another group of students attended an identical IFAL conference June 20-24 at the University of Kentucky. IFAL is designed to expose high school students to college life while helping them explore the different fields of study for careers in agriculture.

  • Kentucky Changers nail down bonds in Grant County

    The teenager from Barboursville found it last week when he came to Grant County with the Kentucky Changers.

    The days were hot. The hours were long. The teens got sweaty and dirty, but didn’t seem to mind, nor complain.

    “I just wanted to help,” Stargel said, taking a rest break from the hot job of pouring concrete in 90-degree temperatures.

    Stargel and other teens from across the state worked in groups completing home improvement projects for families in need.