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Today's News

  • It's a "small world" at St. Elizabeth

     

  • Marconi's Pizza open in Crittenden

    The Grant County News spotlights a business each month in their Business Matters section. If you’d like your business featured call 859-824-3343 or go to www.grantky.com and submit your information to the news department.

    Name of business: Marconi’s Pizza, located in Dalton Plaza, 35 Harlan Street (in Dalton Plaza), Crittenden

    Hours of operation: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to midnight on Friday and Saturday.

    Contact us: 859-428-3278(FAST)
    Manager:  Aaron Moorhead

  • A Blast From The Past 3-17-11

    15 Years Ago
    March 19,1996
    Williamstown’s fifth grade traveling team won the championship game in a tournament hosted by Villa Madonna Academy in Villa Hills.
    They beat St. Paul 49-47.
    Team members included, Chris Collins, Jordon Kenner, A.J. Mason, Adam Gibson, Duane Perry, Matt Collins, Chad Hammons, Ryan Wallters, Jason Beckham and Ryan Wilson.

    25 Years Ago
    March 27, 1986

  • A bond on, off the court

    Eurides said, “To a father growing old, there is nothing dearer than a daughter.”

    For Mark and Tori Wilhoit the bond of father and daughter will go beyond the years of being a coach and player.

    “The beginning was difficult,” he said. “I was pretty hard on her in the beginning, but I wouldn’t trade those years for anything.”

    Tori first got interested in basketball when her dad introduced her to the sport when she was in the fourth grade.

  • Sugar Daddy's doughnuts

    Greg Traylor doesn’t come close to resembling a little, old lady dressed in a white apron hand cranking out fresh donuts on a daily basis, but he does whoop out one tasty treat after another.
    Traylor has worked in construction. He’s worked as a bull dozer operator. He’s operated a backhoe and done septic work and excavating, but cakes, pies and doughnuts?
    Greg isn’t afraid of hard work, just ask anyone who knows him, but he never dreamed that upon opening a donut shop in Dry Ridge he’d be the busiest he’s ever been.

  • Autism doesn’t keep Eggemeier out of sports

    Not many people with autism have the ability to participate in sports, but a Grant County High School sophomore served as a team manager.

    “I love basketball,” Andrew Eggemeier said. “I played basketball in the second and third grade and my team won the county championship.”

  • March Mayhem!

    With the NCAA Tournament starting up this week, students and teachers at Grant County Middle School got their mayhem on with a student-faculty basketball game March 11.

    The game was played between eighth graders and faculty members at GCMS, with the faculty winning the game.

    Proceeds from the concessions at the game went to the GCMS Relay for Life team. Veronica Camacho, co-captain of the relay team, estimated that they raised around $1,000.

  • Addicted

    Jimmie thought he was a good father. Three years later, he knows he was lying to himself.

    The 30-year-old Grant County resident would come home after a day of landscaping full of energy and play with his daughters.

    Jimmie was there for them when they needed him, taking them to the bus stop every morning and driving them to school if need be.

    A football-field length away in a shed behind his Dry Ridge home, Jimmie was making methamphetamine daily.

  • Motorists feel pain at the pumps

    With rising gas prices having no end in sight, people are finding different ways of getting to and from work.
    The national average of gas according to AAA for March 14 is $3.55 per gallon and in Kentucky the average is $3.53 per gallon.
    For Claude Jones of Williamstown, the recent increase in prices has made some lifestyle changes for him and his mother, Rhoda Jones.
    “I live with her right now so that helps cut some money down,” he said. “We have carpooled with both of our vehicles to help with gas.”

  • What if you’re just plain wrong?

    How do you react when your belief turns out to be wrong? When in the face of overwhelming evidence, do you change your belief or do you ignore the evidence?  
    In the first church I served, we had a wonderful elderly woman by the name of Ms. Cricket. Ms. Cricket was unlike any other elderly church-going woman I had ever met. She was in her mid 80s, still plowed her own fields, still drank her own homemade moonshine and still had a house full of birds that she spoke with.