Today's News


    I don’t know I could have missed it, but Feb. 13 was International Day of Self-Love.

    I was probably too busy loving myself that day to notice.

    Daylle Deanna Schwartz, author of “How do I Love Me? Let Me Count the Ways,” is a huge advocate of loving  yourself. She writes a blog called “Lessons from a Recovering Doormat” at Beliefnet.com and offers “I Love Me” tips.

  • Church Notes

    Camp Northward Connections
    • April 16 - Pancake breakfast ($5) - 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. followed by a free community Easter egg hunt at 10:30 a.m. Egg hunting will be divided into age groups from ‘walkers’ to fifth grade students. There will be prize and candy-filled eggs, door prizes, snacks and opportunities to tour the campus. Call 859-654-3865 for more information.

    Christ Community


    Kathyrn Howell of Dry Ridge already had a new puppy.

    Boy, was she surprised when her granddaughter saw a black vehicle shove two Golden Retrievers and a small Chihuahua/terrior mix house dog out and drive away in front of her home on Cason Lane.

    She was even more surprised when one of the retrievers gave birth to 10 small, fuzzy babies – a litter of all girl puppies.

    Howell was only able to save eight of the puppies.

  • Help needed for day of prayer

    Volunteers are needed to help with the National Day of Prayer on May 5. If you can help, an organizational meeting will be held at 7 p.m. April 18 at the Williamstown Christian Church.

  • Time to spruce up!

    If you’ve got a bunch of old tires, car batteries and fluorescent light bulbs lying around your home and don’t know where to dispose of them, you’re in luck.

    The Grant County Solid Waste Management District is sponsoring a free tire disposal from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on April 14, April 15 and April 16 at the state road department on U.S. 25, south of Williamstown.

    This program is part of the Kentucky Tire Amnesty Program, which is held every three to four years in all Kentucky counties.


    In the 1960s, tattooing was considered anti-social, but by the 1990s it was a trendy fashion statement. Today tattoos on rock stars, professional sports figures and even Christian rock musicians are commonplace.

    Daryl Anness has had a broad spectrum of careers, from welder to certified nurse’s assistant, but none more colorful than his current one as proprietor of Jadloc Tattooing.

    “It’s a passion,” Anness says. “ I love it.” I started out getting tattoos when I was 17.”

  • GCHS To Present ‘Annie’

    Grant County High School will present three performances of the musical “Annie” at 7 p.m. April 15 and 16. Saturday, April 16 will have an additional 2 p.m. matinée.
    “Annie” is based on the popular “Little Orphan Annie” comic strip. The 33-member cast includes Grant County elementary, middle and high students. Directors are Faith Clifton and Cheryl Workman. They encourage everyone to come out for the entertainment performed by Grant County students.

  • GCHS To Hold FFA Banquet April 20

    The Grant County High School Future Farmers of America will hold a banquet for members and their families at 6 p.m. April 20 in the high school auditorium. Dinner will be provided by Buetels. New officers will be installed. Students are free and nonmembers will cost $3. Reservations and payment must be received by Richard Gater, the agriculture teacher,  by April 12.


    The Williamstown Board of Education is now accepting nominations for the Wall of Fame.
    This award was created by the Board of Education to recognize graduates who have made a unique and special contribution to society through their work or other notable activities.
    Wall of Fame nominees must be a graduate of the Williamstown High School and must have made a unique and special contribution to society through their work or other notable activities.
    The recipient will be recognized at the commencement exercises at 7 p.m. May 27.

  • Calhoun excels at state geography bee

    Nolan Calhoun, a Grant County Middle School seventh grader who is in Marlon Kinsey’s social studies class, won third place in the state Geography Bee competition at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green on April 1.
    Calhoun won the GCMS’s school-level Geography Bee and then took a written test, which qualified him for the state level competition. Calhoun competed against 95 other students.
    The National Geographic Society presented Nolan and GCMS with a certificate recognizing his accomplishment. He is the son of Michael and Amanda Calhoun of Corinth.