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Today's News

  • Community Calendar 12-18-08

     

     

    CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS

  • Grant County girls’ battle Walton-Verona

    Early turnovers helped the Grant County Lady Braves, but late turnovers helped Walton-Verona come away with a 44-33 win on Dec. 11.

    “We played hard, competed and had a chance to win,” coach Darrell Guffey said. “Turnovers and defensive rebounding have been the key for us all year. We need to stick our nose in there and box out. We came out aggressive and that was good. We got much better and that’s the important thing.”

  • Trees, decorations can be fire hazard

    Colorful lights, luminous candles and other Christmas decorations can lead a cheerful holiday to go up in flames without safety precautions.

    Each year, fire departments across the country respond to an average of 210 structure fires caused by Christmas trees, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).

    Forty-nine percent of those fires are caused by electrical problems while 27 percent are caused by a heat source being too close to the tree.

  • Lady Demons roll off three straight wins

    The Lady Demons had a busy week.

    The Williamstown girls’ team had four games in a week, coming away with three wins over Gallatin County, North Oldham and Trimble County and a loss against Simon Kenton.

    Starting the week by hosting Gallatin County, the Lady Demons came away with a 62-56 win on Dec. 15.

  • Seniors extend high school cross country careers

    Their high school careers could have ended at the state meet, but several Grant County High School cross country runners decided to lengthen their careers with two races.

    On Nov. 22, Natalie Norman, Jeffrey Covington, Brandon McIntosh and Aaron Jump raced in the KTCCCA Senior Challenge, held at Masterson Station Park in Lexington.

    Norman was selected to represent the North team as one of the top seniors in the region. She proved her worth, coming in third overall and second for the North. Her performance helped the North take first place in the competition.

  • Former jail deputies sentenced

    Wesley Lanham and Shawn Freeman finally found out how long they’ll spend behind bars for their role in a 2003 rape at the Grant County Detention Center.

    Lanham, 31, of Dry Ridge and Freeman, 36, of Erlanger, were sentenced Dec. 8 in U.S. District Court in Covington by Judge Danny Reeves.

    Lanham received a 15-year sentence, while Freeman received a 14-year sentence.

    Both were former deputies at the Grant County Detention Center.

  • Homecoming happenings

    The Williamstown boys’ basketball team wanted to enjoy homecoming. They wanted to enjoy the dance that followed their game and have fun with alumni that returned.

    The Demons did all that and more, coming away with a 70-63 win over Lexington Sayre on Dec. 13.

  • Braves earn district win over Simon Kenton

    Before the season started, GCHS coach Ron Kinmon believed that Simon Kenton was the team to beat in the district.

    With a 55-47 win on Dec. 12, the Braves did just that.

    “It’s nice because it was a district win,” Kinmon said. “The team played extremely well. The first half we played a little nervous, but we settled down and played a great second half.”

    The game was back and forth from the beginning, as Simon Kenton scored first, but Caleb Kinmon hit a three pointer to take the lead.

  • School cuts felt locally

    Financially strapped school districts across the state may soon take another hit in state funding.

    Kentucky Commissioner of Education Jon Draud recently sent an e-mail to all state superintendents notifying them that the Office of the State Budget Director wants the Kentucky Department of Education to submit a plan for a 4-percent funding cut across the board.

    The cut would reduce the state budget for primary-12th grade education by approximately $132 million, Draud wrote.

  • Farm manager finds sweet solution for piles of poop

    If you’ve got horses, you’ve got waste. If you got horse manure, then you’ve probably got a smell and flies.

    At Folsom Ridge Farm, their poop doesn’t stink. Well, it doesn’t after Todd Foster, the farm manager, gets through with it.

    Foster, who has worked with horses most of his life has started to recycle the farms horse manure by composting it.