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Police

  • Williamstown needs more firefighters

    Williamstown Fire Chief Les Whalen is normally the only one at the station when it is time to respond to a call.

    The department has 25 to 35 volunteers, but Whalen may only be able to utilize one to two when a fire needs to be put out.

    And, those volunteers may be busy working or they may have just got off from a 24-hour shift at another fire department.

    That is why staffing is the greatest concern Whalen has for his fire department.

  • IN THE FIRE

    Sixty percent of the fire and EMS calls answered by the Dry Ridge Fire Department are outside of the city limits.

    However, the city is paying for 100 percent of the needs to provide those services.

    That dilemma could bring crucial changes because of the drain it has put on the city’s finances.

  • Jonesville chief says cooperation is key

    Jonesville Fire Department may have the smallest coverage area of any of Grant County’s fire departments, but that doesn’t mean they don’t need more funding to operate.

    “We’re paying our bills,” said Fire Chief Chase Duvall. “Our progress has developed over different funding streams.”

    Jonesville Fire Department has 18 members. The town lies on the Grant/Owen county line and receives funding from the fiscal court of both counties.

  • Crittenden needs funds to outfit volunteers

    Lee Burton is trying to catch up on paperwork, especially after his March got busy in a hurry when a tornado ripped through Crittenden.

    Burton, Crittenden’s fire chief, spent the next couple of weeks, dealing with the aftermath and relief efforts from the deadly storms.

    Often in the morning, Burton can be found at the firehouse.

    He’s not paid to do the job, but believes it is a calling.

  • Corinth needs new fire house, trucks

    Daylight streams inside the Corinth Fire House from a large crack in the building’s exterior wall. Another crack shows a blue sky outside where the roof meets a wall at the rear of the structure.

    Inside where the trucks are housed, two of the Corinth Fire Department’s emergency vehicles are sitting less than a quarter of an inch apart because there’s not room inside if they aren’t nearly touching.

    The small department’s home was once used as an ice cream parlor, a dance hall, slaughterhouse and a garage.

  • UNDER FIRE

    The fire chiefs from Crittenden, Corinth, Dry Ridge, Jonesville and Williamstown share a common problem. They say a lack of funding and shortage of manpower is hampering their ability to provide service to their communities.

  • Marijuana charges dropped against GCMS teacher

    A Harrison County grand jury did not indict Dr. Nicholas Catey on charges of cultivating marijuana.

    Catey, a special education teacher at Grant County Middle School for 15 years, was charged on Jan. 20 when Kentucky State Police executed a warrant for him at his Berry home.

    Police said they found marijuana plants growing in pots on his farm.

    Catey was placed on unpaid leave on Jan. 26 pending the outcome of the case.

  • Marathon robbed, public help needed to ID suspects

    Police are hoping the public can help them solve a break in at the Marathon Station on Ky. 36 in Williamstown.

    They may be related to three other break ins that occurred recently at Peg’s Pit Stop in Corinth and the Jonesville Country Store.

    According to police, at least two, possibly three suspects, broke out a side window around 12:30 a.m. on Feb. 26.

  • Crittenden chief steps up to handle disaster

    Lee Burton handles yet another phone call.

    He’s calm, polite and efficient.

    He makes notes on a yellow legal pad. He’s being asked to coordinate a shot clinic.

    His office door opens and another note is shoved at him.

    He picks up a large mug of coffee and takes a sip, as he looks around his small office inside the Crittenden Fire House.

    It’s been a long two days, but the dark shadows under his eyes are the only signs he’s not slept since a tornado ripped through his town.

  • Deputy watches ‘ugly sky‘

    As a deputy with the Grant County Sheriff’s Department, Andy Reeves has seen his share of sights, but March 2 he saw something he’d never seen before.

    Reeves, a resident of Ky. 491 in Crittenden, said he saw the funnel cloud pass his house.

    “The sky was this ugly, weird color,” he said. “It turned green. Everything else had been cloudy and blue, but you could see this coming.”

    Reeves said he and his wife went to their basement, into their lower level garage, inside their truck and waited.