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Local News

  • Bank of Kentucky buys Integra

    The Bank of Kentucky, which is headquartered in Crestview Hills, purchased three branches of Integra Bank, including two in Grant County and one in Warsaw.

    Integra has locations in Dry Ridge and Crittenden.

    Bank of Kentucky has two locaions in Dry Ridge - one on Taft Highway and one inside Wal-Mart.

  • Rich takes over helm of Williamstown police

    There’s a new chief in Williamstown.

    Al Rich, a resident of Williamstown, began his duties as the city’s police chief on Sept. 1.

    Rich was one of six applicants. He was selected by a committee appointed by Mayor Glenn Caldwell.

    “He brings a lot of experience and a different eye,” said Caldwell.

  • Swine flu scare?

    The good news for Grant County is that the N1H1 flu hasn’t been “confirmed” in the community.

    “We do not have a ‘confirmed’ case of swine flu,” said Nancy Howe, director of public information for Grant County schools, following reports a case had been confirmed at one of the district’s elementary schools.

  • Daycare rides to cost Williamstown parents

    Parents of Williamstown Elementary students who have relied on school bus transportation to and from out-of-district daycares soon will have to pay.

    For years, the school district has taken students from Kiddie College and Mom’s Christian Daycare (formerly New Discovery South) in Dry Ridge free of charge.

    However, when Superintendent Sally Skinner began looking into the liability issue surrounding transporting out-of-district students, another problem was discovered.

  • One book - one community

    A tale of guns, murder and betrayal will be showcased in a program built around the shared experience of people reading and talking about the same book.

    The Grant County Public Library will join fellow libraries in Kenton, Boone and Campbell counties to participate in One Book, One Community for the second consecutive year.

    Last year’s book was George Ella Lyon’s 1997 novel “With a Hammer for My Heart”.

  • School enrollment increases in local districts

    More students are in the hallways at Grant County and Williamstown schools this year as enrollment numbers rise.

    Grant County Schools enrollment reached 3,894 students as of Aug. 28, up 64 students from the end of the 2008-09 school year.

  • First Love Community Church has planned what they hope to be the first of many community concerts and events.

    “We just want to be a light to this community and serve anyone that God wants us to,” said First Love Pastor David Hammonds.

    The first event is called “Faith Fest.” It will be held from 2 to 8 p.m. Sept. 19 at the church’s property one-half mile past Cracker Barrel in Dry Ridge.

  • Crittenden factory to expand

    A Crittenden factory will be undergoing a $3.2 million expansion that will bring several new jobs to northern Grant County.

    Wolf Steel USA, a manufacturer of stoves, fireplaces, gas grills and accessories, recently broke ground on the expansion.

    Slated to be completed by March 2010, the project will add 72,150 square feet to the company’s existing 39,000 square-foot facility to increase warehousing, manufacturing and distribution space.

  • BUSTED

    Police officers from several agencies were out early on Aug. 27 as they rounded up 32 people suspected of making and selling drugs.

    Operation Grab-A-Lab was the culmination of an eight-month undercover investigation in Grant and surrounding counties.

    It focused on suspects believed to be trafficking in controlled substances, including prescription pain killers and methamphetamine. Other targets included individuals believed to manufacturing methamphetamine and those illegally distributing precursors.

  • HELP!

    Too many animals at the Grant County Animal Shelter galvanized volunteers to hold an adoption fair on Aug. 29 at Wal-Mart in Dry Ridge and PetSmart in West Chester on Aug. 30. More than 50 dogs and cats were adopted during the two days . “It’s good for now and to a place where we can handle it,” said Brent Caldwell, animal control officer. “But there’s a good possibility by the end of the week that we could fill back up.”