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Local News

  • Hot, hot, hotter - where can you find heat relief?

    Temperatures are starting to rise again. The heat is back. How can homeowners fight the heat and save money on air conditioning?

    In order for the Northern Kentucky Health Department to declare a heat alert there has to be one of three things: two consecutive days with temperatures at 95 degrees or above, one day with temperatures at 105 degrees or above, or one day with temperatures at 95 degrees or above when the night temperatures don’t go below 75 degrees.

  • Local churches lend hand to KY Changers

    Many Grant County churches were home base for 150 teenagers last week. They donated their time, money and patience to help with Kentucky Changers.

    At 7:30 a.m., 150 teenagers and numerous volunteers were picked up from Grant County High School and brought to different locations in Crittenden, Dry Ridge, Williamstown, Corinth, Berry, Demossville and Walton.

    Around 11:30 a.m., lunches were made and handed to 350 hungry workers.

    Whenever necessary, extra paint, wood, hammers, water and other supplies were brought to the the houses.

  • Annual event finds new home on Baton Rouge Rd.

    Don’t go to Grant County Park in Crittenden looking for the fair this year.

    It has moved.

    The Grant County Fair has a new home on Baton Rouge Road, off Arnie Risen Boulevard, in Williamstown, called the Northern Kentucky Fairgrounds.

    “I think the public is going to be pretty surprised when they see our new home,” said Fair Board President Bill Cull. “But they need to be patient. Not everything is done like we want but we ran into a time crunch because of the wet weather this spring.”

  • Crittenden adopts 2009-2010 budget

    While cities across Kentucky are having to adjust to tough economic times, Crittenden is financially sound.

    The city council recently passed a 2009-10 budget that includes no cuts in general fund appropriations.

    Two departments will receive more money in the coming fiscal year than they did in the 2008-09 budget.

  • Kentucky Changers' generosity helps 30 homeowners

    Several local homeowners were amazed by the difference that can be made when youth care about others.

    About 150 teenagers came to Grant County last week as part of Kentucky Changers, which is an organization sponsored by the Kentucky Baptist Convention that uses seventh through 12th graders to refurbish exteriors of homes.

  • Job Hunt

    Operation: Job Hunt is back.

    After a successful inaugural session, the free program is returning in August to assist the community with job search strategies.

    The 30-hour series, a partnership between Grant County Adult Education and the Grant County Public Library, will teach participants how to create a resume, list references and interview for a job.

    Seven people received a Continuing Education Certificate for completing the first program, which was conducted May through June.

  • Author tells cancer story with humor

    A routine mammogram in April 2007 changed everything for Mary Beth Hall.

    That is when she found out she had breast cancer, a disease she was all too familiar with.

    “It was very scary because my mom died of breast cancer 11 years ago,” Hall said. “It was important that they found it early. That basically saved my life. I was getting mammograms every year like you’re supposed to.”

    Hall, guidance counselor at Grant County High School, had surgery to remove the cancer, followed by aggressive chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

  • Dry Ridge man dies in boat accident

    A day of waterskiing and fun with friends turned tragic last week when Grant Griffith, the father of twin sons, was killed on July 3.

    Griffith, 28, of Dry Ridge, fell off his skis and was hit by a passing boat around 2:30 p.m. on Williamstown Lake.

    Friends pulled him from the water and attempted CPR, but Griffith was killed instantly.

    Despite a long holiday weekend, the lake was not overly crowded, said Williamstown Assistant Police Chief Chris Hankins.

  • Summer program feeds need for free food

    Children do not have to wait until classes are back in session to eat nutritious school food.

    A weekly summer feeding program that began June 15 provides free food consisting of all five food groups for youth 18 years old and younger.

    “It saves households grocery money because they can feed all of their children at no cost as long as they’re not 19 years of age,” said Jan Kushniroff, director of food services for Grant County Schools.

    The federally funded program has changed this year.

  • School is NOT out for some students

    Unlike the song, school is not out for summer for everyone.

    Some students at Grant County High School and Williamstown Independent Schools have been hard at work in the classroom while others are enjoying their break.

    At Grant County High School, about 60 students attend summer school in the morning while the afternoon session has an enrollment of about 35.

    Summer school, which costs the district about $16,000, began June 15 and ends July 10 for Grant County students.