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Local News

  • Suspect 'shocked' by police

    When a Morehead man, who kept police at bay for over two hours, opened his car door to urinate, he was in for a shock.

    Police shot Carl E. Lewis, 47, with a taser and took him into custody.

    Grant County Sheriff’s Deputy Brian Maines said he received a call of a motorist jumping into traffic just south of the Crittenden exit in the northbound lane.

    Maines arrived at 11 p.m. Feb. 26. He said a Kenton County police officer was talking to Lewis and asked Maines to assist him. He also warned Maines that Lewis had a rifle in the vehicle.

  • Crittenden man arrested for manufacturing meth

    Agents of the Northern Kentucky Drug Strike Force, assisted by deputies from the Boone County Sheriff’s Department and Grant County Sheriff’s Department, have charged a Crittenden man with manufacturing methamphetamine.

    On March 4, Northern Kentucky Drug Strike Force agents and Boone County Sheriff’s deputies stopped a pickup truck in Burlington. The truck was driven by David E. Houze, 46, of Crittenden. Agents searched the vehicle and found materials used to manufacture methamphetamine.

  • GCHS baseball team holds clinic

    The Grant County High School baseball team is hosting their annual youth baseball clinic.

    The clinic will be held on March 13 and 14 and is for ages 6 to 15. 

    Contact Coach Derrick Lee at 502-319-4645 or Tracy Goe at 859-322-6739 for more information.

  • Taking the plunge

    Most people wouldn’t dare stick their little toe in a pool in 40-degree weather.

    But, 11 Williamstown High School students waited 90 minutes in only T-shirts and shorts just for the chance to jump in the near-freezing water.

    “It sounded fun until you’re up there,” said senior Todd Hammond said. “I was going as fast as I could. I hit one step of the ladder and went over.”

  • Historical Society to meet March 15

    The Grant County Historical Society will meet Monday, March 15 at the Dry Ridge Christian Church, 13 School Street. Dinner is at 6 p.m. and is $7.50 per person and will be followed by the program and business meeting.

  • Grant couple sues Toyota

    A Grant County couple is suing Toyota claiming their Tundra unexpectedly accelerated out of control and caused the pick-up to hit an embankment.

    The federal lawsuit was filed after Toyota recently announced the company would begin fixing accelerator pedals in more than two million recalled vehicles.

    Tina Preedom was driving on Sherman Newtown Road toward U.S. 25 in Grant County on Oct. 17, 2009 when the car’s sudden alleged acceleration forced the vehicle off the roadway, down an embankment and over railroad tracks.

  • Bridge replacement begins March 1

    The wait is over for construction to begin on a new bridge at the south end of Williamstown.

    Construction will begin March 1 to replace the aged and crumbling concrete bridge over the railroad tracks on U.S. 25 near Red Carpet Inn.

    During construction, traffic will continue to use the bridge.

    The new concrete bridge will be built 60 feet west of the existing bridge and will have sidewalks on both sides.

    Sunset Drive, located at the southern approach to the existing bridge, will be partially removed.

  • Lawmakers work on budget shortfall

    As the 2010 General Assembly continues in Frankfort, the Grant County News checked in with local legislators, Rep. Royce Adams, D-Dry Ridge, and Sen. Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown.

    What were your thoughts on Gov. Steve Beshear’s budget proposal and how do you see the budget process going forward?

  • Feeding the need via a mobile food pantry

    Fifty pounds is a lot of food.

    For those who line up monthly at Vineyard Church in Grant County to receive a cart full of groceries, it’s a lifeline.

    “The stories we hear from the people are heart-wrenching,” said Anita Waver, agency relations manager for the Cincinnati-based Freestore Foodbank. “We hear people who are coming for the first time because they lost their job. They’re not used to this. They’re used to providing for themselves and their families.”

  • Justice center nearly done

    The $14.5 million Grant County Judicial Center in Williamstown is in the finishing stages and is expected to open by April.

    The center was approved by the Kentucky General Assembly in 2005 and funding was authorized in 2006.

    “It’s come along very well,” said Judge-Executive Darrell Link, who toured the facility Feb. 11. “The courtrooms are almost finished. They’re working on punch lists on the second floor. We’re, I think, in the final stage.”