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Local News

  • Crittenden, Corinth join KLC lawsuit

    Two Grant County cities recently decided to join a class action lawsuit filed against the Kentucky League of Cities.

    The lawsuit, filed by attorney Brandon Voelker on behalf of the city of Cold Spring, alleges “financial improprieties,” including unauthorized financial benefits, altered compensation without board approval, direct conflicts of interests involving expenditures and breach of fiduciary duties by KLC.

    The claims stem from spending excesses from July 2006 to June 2009 brought to light by the state auditor’s office.

  • Excellence in Education

    Pat Conrad almost missed her calling.

    In her second year at Eastern Kentucky University, she had no desire to become a teacher.

    After spending 28 years as family consumer science teacher at Grant County High School, Conrad can’t imagine being anything else.

  • Google Doodle

    A college scholarship and worldwide Web fame is on the line for a Williamstown High School freshman.

    Emily Caudill, daughter of Scott and Ecie Caudill, is one of 40 regional finalists in a national contest by Google.

    She was selected from 33,000 entries in the Doodle 4 Google contest.

    Caudill is in the Grade 7-9 Category, Region 7. Only one vote per computer. To vote for her doodle, go to www.google.com/doodle4google/vote.htm.

    For more information about this story, pick up a print copy of Thursday's Grant County News.

  • Lewis Hankins will bring history to life

    Lewis Hankins has been interested in Mark Twain/Samuel Clemens since he was a child.

    He just didn’t know that interest in reading his famous works such as “Tom Sawyer” and “Huck Finn” would grow into a lifelong passion.

    One that he’ll share at 7 p.m. on May 14 as he presents “Marking Twain, An Impersonation”, at the Welfare House in Crittenden.

    Hankins, a former Grant County resident, who now calls Hilton Head, S.C. home, has always liked to read.

  • Excellence in Business

    When Paula Roe found out that students who attend Eagle Creek Learning Center could only get exercise when there is good weather, she was moved to action.

    Roe, the administrator at St. Elizabeth Medical Center- Grant County, purchased two Wii Fit game systems for the students.

    “This was the best idea ever,” said Eli Helton, a student at Eagle Creek, Grant County’s alternative school for middle and high school students.

    Roe delivered the gaming system in person and stuck around to challenge all the students at a game of bowling.

  • High-speed headed to Corinth

    Thanks to a federal grant, the citizens of Corinth will have high-speed Internet available from the city of Williamstown.

    Williamstown was awarded $535,000 through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Williamstown will match it with $134,000.

    “We were excited,” said Mayor Glenn Caldwell. “You don’t get that kind of money very often.”

    The grant will allow the expansion of Williamstown’s cable and Internet service into Corinth and New Columbus.

    The project will require construction of 25 miles of pole lines.

  • Little girls fight cancer with cookies

    Three little girls from Grant County decided they could make a difference so, with the help of their mothers, they held a bake sale to raise money to fight cancer.

    Lauren Cleveland and BrentLee Threlkeld, both age 5, along with Karson Heaverin, 3, pulled their resources and that’s what they did.

    The trio held a bake sale last month at Williamstown Christian Church and raised $230 for Mrs. Vickie’s Wildflower Relay For Life team.

  • They said what?

    Voters got a chance to “Meet the Candidates” for the May 18 primary during a forum April 29 at Williamstown High School.

    Sponsored by the Grant County News and the Grant County Chamber of Commerce, the event featured a question and answer session with candidates for judge-executive, jailer, sheriff, magistrate for the first district and state representative.

    Questions were determined by public submissions and the editorial team of the Grant County News.

    Jamie Baker-Nantz, editor of the Grant County News, served as moderator of the event.

  • Don't cook or clean, but his kitchen is ready to feed hungry

    Larry Spears doesn’t cook, he doesn’t serve and he doesn’t clean at the Spears Kitchen in Dry Ridge, but he is the driving force behind getting people a good, hearty, warm meal for free five days a week.

    For all of his work in Grant County, Spears was named the Grant Countian of the Year at the annual Chamber of Commerce awards banquet on April 24.

    “It means a lot to me because I’ve spent a lot of my life here,” Spears said.

  • Got 25 cents?

    Women, pull the change purses out of the closet. Men, find an old bucket in the garage. Children, break into those piggy banks. It’s time to gear-up for the Dry Ridge Elementary School’s Relay for Life Team Quarter Auction from 6 to 9 p.m. May 8 at the JMB Hall in Dry Ridge. Attendees need only two things - lots of quarters and a storage container for all those coins.

    The Dry Ridge Elementary School Relay team has been hosting two quarter auctions a year for the last five years, and the event has continually grown.