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Local News

  • DUTY & HONOR

    Family and friends of soldiers in the Kentucky National Guard Alpha Battery, 2nd Battalion, 138th Artillery, gathered for a community sendoff on Sept. 1 at Carroll County High School.


    The 62 members of the local unit will join more than 500-member battalion at Camp Atterbury in Indiana for a month of training. The unit will then be sent to the Horn of Africa for nine months to provide security to a U.S. naval base. They will also be training with other coalition forces in the region.

  • Verona man kills intruder

    A Richmond, Ky. man is dead and two Dry Ridge men are in jail after a 92-year-old Verona man said the trio broke into his home on Sept. 3.

  • Grant improves, Williamstown ranks high in ACT results

    Grant County High School saw improvements and Williamstown High School remained highly ranked in recently released ACT results.
    The data released by the Kentucky Department of Education is from high school juniors who took the test during the 2011-12 school year.
    Since 2008, state law has mandated all of Kentucky’s public school juniors participate in the ACT, which assesses English, reading, mathematics and science and is scored on a scale of 1 to 36.

  • MAKING AN IMPACT

    Where is Christ?
    Williamstown United Methodist Pastor Barry Robinson said that is the question many asked when a devastating March tornado ripped through Crittenden leaving property and homes in destruction.
    As the pews of the church overflowed Saturday with willing volunteers to help tornado victims in Grant and surrounding counties, Robinson provided the answer.

  • Doyle leaves Grant 4-H job to become Carroll agent

    Joyce Doyle has left the county.
    The former teacher, coach, principal, truant officer and 4-H agent has left Grant County to be Carroll County’s newest 4-H agent.
    “I’m a person who really, really has to have a challenge,” Doyle said, last Friday, as she packed up her 4-H office on Baton Rouge Road in Williamstown.

  • U.S. 25 yard sale brings in shoppers, even Gumby

    They came, they saw and they bought.
    That’s what Judy Wigginton had in mind when she organized the U.S. 25 yard sale held last weekend.
    Several yard sales dotted lawns and parking lots throughout the county, and in surrounding states.
    Tyler Tolle, of Williamstown, found a unique way to grab motorists attention.


    Despite heat and humidity on Aug. 16, the first day of the four-day event, he donned a pickle green Gumby costume and waved people into his yard.

  • Touchdown helps 12-year-old kick cancer

    Jacob Vickers is just 12 years old, but he’s a fighter and a survivor. He was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, or a cancerous tumor of the muscles attached to bone. It is rare and the most common soft tissue tumor in children. In the six years since it was discovered, he’s fought hard and undergone round after round of chemotherapy and radiation. This past July was spent in the hospital.


    His cancer is in remission and he’s been able to return to schools. This year he’s in sixth grade at Grant County Middle School.

  • Back 2 School
  • Background checks no longer free for school districts

    State budget cuts have led school districts to scramble to decide how to pay for mandatory criminal background checks for volunteers.
    From field trip chaperones and athletic and band boosters to reading mentors, schools rely on volunteers daily.
    The Administrative Office of the Courts has covered the $10 cost per background check for nearly 20 years at the state public and private schools, including processing nearly 217,000 criminal record reports statewide in 2011.

  • Volunteers needed to give hope, help on Aug. 25

    Hope reigns and the members of Williamstown United Methodist Church want hope to rain down on the community on Aug. 25.
    Impact Kentucky,  a state-wide initiative of United Methodist Churches, will be in communities across the state using more than 700 volunteers to repair homes and businesses damaged by the spring’s tornadoes, as well as distributing clothes and food and hosting a free carnival.