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Local News

  • Cahill doesn't mind helping others

    Billie Cahill is uncomfortable talking about herself, and quickly changes the subject to talking about what she loves—her children and perhaps, your children.

    Cahill was chosen as the Grant County Volunteer of the Year at this year’s chamber of commerce banquet for her dedication to the creation of the Grant County Schools Welcome Center located at Sherman Elementary School and for serving as its volunteer director.

    For more information about this story, please pick up a copy of Thursday's Grant County News.

  • Election 2010

    Democrat:

    U.S. Senator

    Darlene F. Price - 217

    Maurice W. Sweeney - 89

    James Buckmaster -  132

    Jack Conway - 1,104

    Daniel Mongiardo - 959

    State Representative

    Royce W. Adams - 2,240

    Johnny Masters - 502

    County Judge-Executive

    Arnold Bolog - 704

    Darrell Link - 2,016

    Sheriff

    Chris Hankins -  1,045

    Chuck Dills - 1,679

    Bill King -  46

    Jailer

    Tom King - 100

    Steven L. Kellam - 1,020

    Terry Peeples - 1,647

  • Crittenden budget discussion gets heated

    It got “hot” in Crittenden after Mayor Gayle Cayton proposed decreasing the fire department’s budget in the 2010-2011 budget.

    Cayton presented the budget to the council on May 3. It called for decreasing the fire department’s portion but allocating more money for police.

    If approved, the budget would decrease the amount paid to the fire department by $5,000 and increase the amount paid to the Grant County Sheriff’s office by $8,000.

  • Dog licenses due July 1; stricter enforcement coming

    If you own a dog and live in Grant County, then you’d better make sure and purchase a dog license.

    Because of the number of stray or unwanted animals that end up at the Grant County Animal Shelter, the animal control officer is cracking down.

    A dog license is required by county ordinance for all dogs. See chart for license fees.

     “We haven’t enforced this in the past, but we’re going to start,” said Brent Caldwell, animal shelter director.

  • Crittenden votes against salary increases

    While the city of Crittenden has experienced an influx of people, new subdivisons, homes and apartments, the salary for the Crittenden mayor and city council members hasn’t increased in 10 years and the present mayor, Gayle Cayton, thinks that is a shame.

  • Special Olympics torch to run through Grant County

    The Special Olympics Flame of Hope torch will make its way through Grant County on May 27 on the journey to Richmond for the 2010 Summer Games.

    The torch will begin its quest May 17 in Daviess County before continuing on its path through the state May 26 in Kenton County.

    The following day, Grant County will participate in the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics.

    For more information about this story, pick up a print copy of Thursday's Grant County News.

  • Being a survivor

    Barb Burgess never dreamed she would get cancer. That all changed in August 2009 when she went for her annual mammogram.

    The doctors noticed a questionable spot that eventually was diagnosed as breast cancer.

  • Veterans honored with free lunch, patriotic music

    Reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the American flag never seemed more appropriate than May 8 in the Williamstown High School cafeteria.

    The words to the national anthem, heard countless times before meaningless baseball games, meant everything to a roomful of veterans who fought to preserve freedom.

    Patriotism became contagious as veterans were honored with a free luncheon program that had attendees singing along to inspirational songs and remembering those lost in war.

  • Crittenden, Corinth join KLC lawsuit

    Two Grant County cities recently decided to join a class action lawsuit filed against the Kentucky League of Cities.

    The lawsuit, filed by attorney Brandon Voelker on behalf of the city of Cold Spring, alleges “financial improprieties,” including unauthorized financial benefits, altered compensation without board approval, direct conflicts of interests involving expenditures and breach of fiduciary duties by KLC.

    The claims stem from spending excesses from July 2006 to June 2009 brought to light by the state auditor’s office.

  • Excellence in Education

    Pat Conrad almost missed her calling.

    In her second year at Eastern Kentucky University, she had no desire to become a teacher.

    After spending 28 years as family consumer science teacher at Grant County High School, Conrad can’t imagine being anything else.