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Local News

  • Kentuckians, including one equine, participate in inaugural festivities

    A horse trained at Asbury University will be in the spotlight Friday during the presidential inaugural parade.
    Bojangles, who was part of Asbury’s Service Mount Training Program, is now part of the Black Horse Troop at Culver Academies in Indiana. Asbury said in a news release that Bojangles will escort the president as the lead horse in the troop.
    Asbury’s training program for service mounts allows equine studies students to get training experience while preparing horses to become police mounts or to serve in other capacities.

  • Two Grant County locals attend Presidential Inauguration in nation’s capital

    Two Grant County citizens attended the 2017 Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C. Friday, Jan. 20, witnessing history as Donald Trump took the oath of office and assumed the U.S. presidency.

    As soon as Trump was announced the victor on Election Day, Bren Murphy, owner and director of Iron Crow Art Gallery, wrote a letter to U.S. Sen. Rand Paul requesting to represent Kentucky during the inauguration, alongside husband Dustin Murphy. Bren said they knew the ceremony would be memorable because of the polarizing nature of the election.

  • Will. city council approves police training for body cameras

    The Williamstown City Council passed a municipal order on Tuesday, Jan. 17 authorizing city police to begin training to use body cameras as part of new department policy.
    The cameras will be attached to the officers’ uniforms and are to be activated during any interactions with citizens, according to Williamstown Police Chief Al Rich.  All five officers will begin training in about a week.

  • Shively family still healing from bus crash

    Every morning when Cody Shively opens his eyes and views the world with double vision, he is reminded of that fateful day 10 years ago that changed his life forever.

    Cody was one of 17 students onboard a Grant County school bus on Jan. 17, 2007 when the driver, Angelynna Young, overcorrected after veering off the road on U.S. 25 near Sherman and sent the bus crashing into a utility pole.  A drug test showed that Young had marijuana, cocaine and painkillers in her system at the time of the crash.

  • Grand jury releases report on jail

    A Grant County grand jury returned no indictments Jan. 11 after inspecting the Grant County Detention Center and hearing testimony and reviewing documents regarding several complaints at the jail.
    The grand jury heard testimony from Jailer Chris Hankins, Judge-Executive Steve Wood and magistrates Shawna Coldiron, Bobby Newman and Jacqalynn Riley, among others.

  • Grant adds two school board members

    The Grant County School Board has added two new members.
    Lisa Smith of Dry Ridge and Bryan Slaughter of Crittenden were recently appointed to the board to replace outgoing members Jim Colson and Alice Heeger-Hartman.
    Both Colson and Heeger-Hartman decided to not run for re-election for their seats in the November 2016 election.
    Smith is not new to serving Grant County Schools.
    She has served as the parent member of Grant County High School Site-Based Decision Making Council the past four years.

  • Blood drive helps offset dip in donations

    Blood is always in high demand at local hospitals, especially during the winter months.  The Hoxworth Blood Center at the University of Cincinnati looked to increase the amount of blood in circulation with their blood drive at the Grant County Public Library on Thursday, Jan. 12.

  • Lt. Gov visits GCHS

    Kentucky Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton wants Grant County students to know that the odds are never too great as long as they’re willing to work hard and believe in themselves.

    The Bluegrass State’s second-in-command visited Grant County High School on Thursday, Jan. 12 to view the Career and Technology Center, and to speak with students about her military and engineering careers, her decision to run for lieutenant governor and her life-long hunger for knowledge.

  • Semi-truck crash blocks off all lanes of traffic on I-75 for hours

    Interstate 75 southbound was closed for about seven hours on Tuesday, Jan. 10 after a semi-truck crashed at about 3 p.m., blocking off all lanes, according to Scott County Sheriff Tony Hampton.  The closure caused traffic backup well into Grant County.
    Hampton said a semi-truck pulling a trailer full of wood was traveling southbound on I-75 in the slow lane near the 141-mile marker when three vehicles that were pulled off on the right shoulder began merging left.

  • Corinth resident encourages fellow playwrights to pursue their dreams

    As a new year began in 2010, Corinth resident William McCann, Jr. pondered on what he wanted to do with the rest of his life. The 55-year-old English professor at Bluegrass Community Technical College had a lifelong passion for theater, and decided it was time to pursue his dream of writing plays.