Local News

  • Honoring the AMERICAN WORKER

    Cindy Whittamore has worked since she was 16 years old.
    Since November 2004, she’s been greeting customers at the Waffle House in Dry Ridge and she has a hands-on approach to work.
    Her employees consider her a “blessing.”

    “There’s isn’t a job she won’t tackle or try to do. There isn’t a task she expects us to do that she wouldn’t herself. Cindy is a friend to all and gives her best everyday,” said Kim Barber.
    Whittamore, of Dry Ridge, enjoys her customers and employees.

  • Ashamed or proclaimed?

    Today there are so called believers in Christ who call themselves Christian or followers of Christ. According to statistics in the U.S., about 78 percent of adults (247 million) identify themselves as Christian.
    Yet, is this according to the standard of truth and the definition of a Christian according to the apostolic writings of the Biblical New Testament? If this statistic was absolutely true than my question is why is our country not led by the majority of Christians?

  • POLICE REPORTS 9-10-15

    (Editor’s Note: The Grant County News publishes all items in police beat that are submitted from each individual police agency. The News does not omit names from police reports.)

    Officer David Osborne executed a warrant for Justin R. Simpson, 27, of Dry Ridge, for contempt of court libel/slander resistance to order, at 9:08 p.m. Sept. 1 on Broadway Street. Simpson was lodged at the Grant County Detention Center.
    Officer David Osborne cited Sarah Manning, 25, of Crittenden, with disregarding a traffic control device, at 8:45 p.m. Sept. 1 on KY 22.

  • Local students among spring graduates

    Eastern Kentucky University recognized 1,826 graduates at the conclusion of the Spring 2015 semester.
    The graduates were honored at commencement ceremonies recently.
    Local EKU graduates include:
    • Riley Brooke Colson of Corinth
    • Whitney Renee’ Hilterbran of Corinth
    • Ciara Margaret Lister of Corinth
    • Brittany Lee Brumley of Crittenden
    • Salina Marie Dobias of Crittenden
    • Timothy Cawood Gibson of Crittenden
    • Allison Nicole Jackson of Crittenden

  • Lady Demons drop straight sets to Walton

    The Williamstown Lady Demons looked to get a little taste of revenge Sept. 1 against the Walton-Verona Lady Cats.

    However, it was not the case as they took a tough loss in three sets (25-8, 25-18, 25-21).
    The loss now moves the Demons to a 1-6 record.
    The last time these two teams met it was rough for the Lady Demons.

    They put up as much fight as they could, but lost in three straight sets.
    Starting out, the games looked similar.

  • Williamstown golfers fall to Gallatin

    The Williamstown Demons boy’s golf team hosted Gallatin County on Sept. 2, at the Eagle Creek Country Club.  
    The young Demons have continued to show improvement but they were not able to get the victory losing 234-214.
    Coach Ed Clemons has been pleased with the progress of his team.  

  • Braves fall 4-1 to Franklin Co.
  • Braves lose OT heartbreaker 36-33 to Lloyd

    The Braves suffered a close, heartbreaking overtime loss Sept. 4 against Lloyd in a game that had to be completed the following day after bad weather.
    In a back-and-forth game in which no team had more than a touchdown lead, Grant County fell 36-33 to drop their first game of the season.


    Robin Marshall Jump to Shawna Dawn West and Ronald West, 225 Jericho Road, no amount given
    Robert Riddle and Joyce Riddle to Myron Thornberry II and Tara Thornberry, 1995 Turner Road, $50,000
    Tona Smith and Philip Steinus to Donnie House, 130 Lexington Trails, $185,000
    Gary A. Ruf and Sheila L. Ruf to Michael Caudill and Joyce Caudill, 221 Fairway Drive, $134,000
    David Richmond and Dianna Richmond to John Schulcz and Donna Schulcz, 550 Morgan Creek Road, $153,500

  • Behind the Badge

    Grant County Sheriff’s Deputy Kevin Burke died nearly five years ago.
    He stills remembers it like it was yesterday.
    “It will always come and go no matter how many years go by,” Burke said. “It’s how you deal with it on a day-to-day basis and if you can turn it off.”
    The 15-year law enforcement veteran was handling a routine execution of a misdemeanor arrest warrant when the situation went from dangerous to deadly.