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Local News

  • Governor to visit Dec. 18 at GCHS

    Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear will be bringing his “Beshear About Kentucky” tour to Grant County at 7 p.m. on Dec. 18 at Grant County High School.

    The public is invited to attend this town hall meeting.

    A donation of non-perishable food items is requested. These will be given to Manger Ministries, an outreach program of Lawrenceville Baptist Church.

  • Officers play Santa

    Before he picked out a toy or anything for himself, Devon placed pink roses in the Wal-Mart shopping cart to take to his mother, who was recently diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Devon was just one of several of the 21 children selected for the 2008 Shop With A Cop program who chose presents for his family before choosing something for himself.

    “It’s always amazing to me,” said Grant County Sheriff Chuck Dills. “It’s not about them. They want to buy something for their brothers, sisters, or mom and dad.”

  • Wreaths across America

    Three women braved the wind, rain and cold Monday, Dec. 15, to place Christmas wreaths at each of the 49 grave sites at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North in Williamstown.

    The show of gratitude was a part of Wreaths Across America, a non-profit organization that began more than 15 years ago when Worcester Wreath Company started placing wreaths on the headstones of fallen heroes at Arlington National Cemetery.

  • Suspected grave robber thwarted

    Sandra Lilly hadn’t put a Christmas tree on her son’s grave for fear it would be stolen like the other decorations she’s lovingly placed in Hill Crest Cemetery since her son’s death in May.

    “I told my husband that he had to have one because it’s tradition at our house since Josh was little to have a tree and keep it lit all night on Christmas Eve so Santa could find our house, but I didn’t want it to end up like the other stuff – just gone,” she said.

  • News observes holiday deadlines

    The editorial (news) and advertising deadline for the Dec. 25 issue of The Grant County News will be 3 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 19.

    The News office will be closed for Christmas on Thursday, Dec. 25.

    Express:

    The editorial (news) and advertising deadline for the Dec. 29 issue of The Grant County Express will be 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 23.

     

     

  • Troopers spread holiday cheer, presents

    Saturday, Dec. 6 was cold.

    It was definitely a day for gloves and a warm, winter coat.

    Olivia, a bright-eyed, pint-sized blond, didn’t have a coat to call her own, but by the end of Shop With A Trooper, she was dancing around, proudly showing to anyone who would look, her new hot pink coat with a hood.

    A dozen troopers and supervisors from Kentucky State Police Post 6 in Dry Ridge took 25 children from 10 counties to breakfast and lunch, followed by shopping and visits with Santa as part of the Shop With A Trooper program.

  • Trees, decorations can be fire hazard

    Colorful lights, luminous candles and other Christmas decorations can lead a cheerful holiday to go up in flames without safety precautions.

    Each year, fire departments across the country respond to an average of 210 structure fires caused by Christmas trees, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).

    Forty-nine percent of those fires are caused by electrical problems while 27 percent are caused by a heat source being too close to the tree.

  • Former jail deputies sentenced

    Wesley Lanham and Shawn Freeman finally found out how long they’ll spend behind bars for their role in a 2003 rape at the Grant County Detention Center.

    Lanham, 31, of Dry Ridge and Freeman, 36, of Erlanger, were sentenced Dec. 8 in U.S. District Court in Covington by Judge Danny Reeves.

    Lanham received a 15-year sentence, while Freeman received a 14-year sentence.

    Both were former deputies at the Grant County Detention Center.

  • School cuts felt locally

    Financially strapped school districts across the state may soon take another hit in state funding.

    Kentucky Commissioner of Education Jon Draud recently sent an e-mail to all state superintendents notifying them that the Office of the State Budget Director wants the Kentucky Department of Education to submit a plan for a 4-percent funding cut across the board.

    The cut would reduce the state budget for primary-12th grade education by approximately $132 million, Draud wrote.

  • Farm manager finds sweet solution for piles of poop

    If you’ve got horses, you’ve got waste. If you got horse manure, then you’ve probably got a smell and flies.

    At Folsom Ridge Farm, their poop doesn’t stink. Well, it doesn’t after Todd Foster, the farm manager, gets through with it.

    Foster, who has worked with horses most of his life has started to recycle the farms horse manure by composting it.