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Local News

  • Souder terminated at shelter

    Grant County’s Animal Control Officer has been relieved of his duties.

    Judge-Executive Darrell Link told Jeremy Souder that he was being terminated on June 6.

    Souder had been employed as the director of the animal shelter since 2005. His termination, according to Link, was due to the fact that procedures concerning use of inmates at the shelter had been violated.

  • Grant schools brace for budget cuts

    Facing a $1.8 million deficit, the Grant County school district has been forced to make changes as they approved a tentative budget during their May 14 school board meeting.

    The school district eliminated nine teaching positions from the high school and middle school, while one teacher was let go from an elementary school due to the reduction in the number of students.

  • Teams rally to fight cancer

    Judy Jackson, a teacher at Crittenden-Mount Zion Elementary, has been a part of Relay For Life for six years.

    She began after a push to get every school in the county involved.

    “Our team is not as strong as it used to be as far as people involved because education is a hard field to be in,” Jackson said. “But, I still relay because we still need to find a cure for cancer.”

    Like most people, Jackson has seen the devastating effects cancer can have.

    Her mother died of colon cancer and her 21-year-old nephew died from melanoma.

  • Police discover meth lab in Dry Ridge

    Two Grant County men were arrested in connection with a meth lab after police received a tip that meth was being made on EZY Street.

    Police charged James C. Willen, 28, of Williamstown, and Lanny D. Slaughter, 33, of Dry Ridge, were charged with manufacture of methamphetamine and possession of a controlled substance.

    The pair were arrested at 12:30 a.m. on May 23 after police received a tip from someone in the area reporting a “funny smell.”

    They remain lodged in the Grant County Detention Center.

  • Country Grill to reopen, serve alcohol

    The Country Grill will soon reopen its doors after major renovations and the addition of alcohol sales.

    The restaurant closed Oct. 20, 2008, and shortly after was deeded back to its original owner, John DiGirolamo.

    He opened The Country Grill with his wife, Barbara, Nov. 22, 1988, before selling it in 1999.

    DiGirolamo originally planned to sell the restaurant after recently retaining ownership.

    “We had some bites, but a lot of people wanted to lease it,” he said. “I didn’t really want to lease it.”

  • Dry Ridge changes nuisance ordinance

    The city of Dry Ridge has a new ordinance to deal with properties with dilapidated buildings, out of control grass and weeds and other nuisances.

    The city council passed a second reading of the nuisance ordinance May 18 after tabling a similar, but lengthier ordinance late last year.

    “This ordinance is a lot shorter,” said Mayor Clay Crupper. “We cut out a lot of stuff about burning wood and smoke and noises and things like that. We wanted to keep it simple.”

  • Remembering the fallen

    Geneva Seale gingerly dabbed at the tears filling her eyes during Memorial Day services at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North in Williamstown.

    Seale just buried her husband, a navy veteran, in November.

    “I don’t know why I’m crying,” she said. “I didn’t cry at Christmas, but this is moving with it being Memorial Day and everyone here.”

  • Shrinking dollars = belt tightening

    The state’s budget woes have trickled down to Williamstown Independent Schools as 13 faculty and staff members recently received non-renewal letters for next school year.

    Superintendent Charles Ed Wilson gave “pink slips” to 10 certified non-renewal letters and three classified non-renewal letters by the May 15 deadline.

  • Inmates removed from shelter

    The Grant County Animal Shelter is hurting for help after assistance by local inmates was cut off amid a criminal investigation.

    Four to six inmates of the Grant County Detention Center have worked daily at the animal shelter for years as part of a Class D community service work program.

    Those inmates who are deemed to be a minimal risk are selected for the program in return for following certain guidelines.

    The sheriff’s department is investigating whether inmates broke rules by having in their possession restricted items while working at the shelter.

  • Hoping for a cure

    Encouragement. That is the word that was said over and over during Grant County’s relay for life, Friday, May 29.

    Susan Williams, a cancer survivor, said the relay “helps you understand you’re not the only one and we’re fighting through it.”

    The total amount raised for this year’s relay is $89,604. There were 35 teams this year. The team that raised the most money overall is Dry Ridge Elementary.