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Local News

  • Job Hunt

    Operation: Job Hunt is back.

    After a successful inaugural session, the free program is returning in August to assist the community with job search strategies.

    The 30-hour series, a partnership between Grant County Adult Education and the Grant County Public Library, will teach participants how to create a resume, list references and interview for a job.

    Seven people received a Continuing Education Certificate for completing the first program, which was conducted May through June.

  • Author tells cancer story with humor

    A routine mammogram in April 2007 changed everything for Mary Beth Hall.

    That is when she found out she had breast cancer, a disease she was all too familiar with.

    “It was very scary because my mom died of breast cancer 11 years ago,” Hall said. “It was important that they found it early. That basically saved my life. I was getting mammograms every year like you’re supposed to.”

    Hall, guidance counselor at Grant County High School, had surgery to remove the cancer, followed by aggressive chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

  • Dry Ridge man dies in boat accident

    A day of waterskiing and fun with friends turned tragic last week when Grant Griffith, the father of twin sons, was killed on July 3.

    Griffith, 28, of Dry Ridge, fell off his skis and was hit by a passing boat around 2:30 p.m. on Williamstown Lake.

    Friends pulled him from the water and attempted CPR, but Griffith was killed instantly.

    Despite a long holiday weekend, the lake was not overly crowded, said Williamstown Assistant Police Chief Chris Hankins.

  • Summer program feeds need for free food

    Children do not have to wait until classes are back in session to eat nutritious school food.

    A weekly summer feeding program that began June 15 provides free food consisting of all five food groups for youth 18 years old and younger.

    “It saves households grocery money because they can feed all of their children at no cost as long as they’re not 19 years of age,” said Jan Kushniroff, director of food services for Grant County Schools.

    The federally funded program has changed this year.

  • School is NOT out for some students

    Unlike the song, school is not out for summer for everyone.

    Some students at Grant County High School and Williamstown Independent Schools have been hard at work in the classroom while others are enjoying their break.

    At Grant County High School, about 60 students attend summer school in the morning while the afternoon session has an enrollment of about 35.

    Summer school, which costs the district about $16,000, began June 15 and ends July 10 for Grant County students.

  • Landfill will close

    Epperson Landfill is closing.

    Officials from Republic Services, Inc. say the Williamstown site will close within the next few months.

    Grant County officials, who were notified last week via a letter that the landfill was terminating its expansion plans, say Republic is using this as a tactic to force the county to sign a host agreement with them.

  • Man drowns in Williamstown Lake

    A Grant County man died at Williamstown Lake around 3 p.m. on July 3.

    Grant Griffith, 28, of Dry Ridge, was killed after being struck by a boat.

    Police said he was water-skiing with friends, fell off the skis and was waiting for the boat to pick him back up when another boat hit him.

    Police said his friends pulled him from the water and attempted CPR but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

  • Landfill nears capacity, closing possible

    Is Grant County’s landfill closing?

    Depends on whom you ask.

    Republic Services, the landfill’s owner, announced on Monday they would not continue expansion efforts at the Williamstown site. Without an expansion, the landfill will reach capacity soon and be forced to close.

    Grant County officials say the landfill’s owners have continued to stall negotiations on a county host agreement and are trying to scare the public.

  • Kentucky Changers come to county

    About 30 local homes will be transformed for free through fresh paint and minor repairs.

    The unique opportunity is being offered by Kentucky Changers, an organization sponsored by the Kentucky Baptist Convention that uses seventh through 12th graders to refurbish exteriors of homes.

    For the first time, the project will come to Grant County from July 4-11 with support from the Crittenden Baptist Association.

  • Tea Party returns to courthouse July 4

    Verbal fireworks will be on display July 4 when protesters show their displeasure with increased taxes and unlimited government spending.

    A Tea Party will be held at noon at the Grant County Courthouse for the second time in the past three months.

    John Souder of Dry Ridge hosted a Tax Day Tea Party in April that drew more than 150 participants.

    “They’re doing these again all across the country,” Souder said. “So, I thought little, old Grant County needs to participate again.”