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Government

  • Will Ark park cost taxpayers’ money?

    What will the cost of the Ark Encounter be for Grant County?

    To date, the project, which is estimated to bring more than 900 full and part-time jobs to the community, has cost a little bit of money, a 100-acre piece of property, some cooperation and a lot of time.

  • Williamstown approves Ark agreement

    After some intense questions and some tense moments of silence, Williamstown’s city council voted in favor of entering into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Ark Encounter.

    Mike Zovath, senior vice president and Jim Parsons, attorney, for Answers in Genesis, the developer behind the Ark Encounter, came to the July 5 council meeting to assure council members that their approval of the agreement didn’t obligate the city financially, but would allow the project to continue to move forward.

  • Return to sender?

    If the Jonesville Post Office closes, Arbidella Richardson is afraid for the town she’s called home for many years.

    “When you lose your post office, you lose your town,” she said.

    In an effort to trim its budget, the United States Postal Service has closed small, rural post offices across the country and the Jonesville location could be next.

    Postal officials have scheduled a meeting at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, July 12 at the Jonesville Fire House to discuss the issue and hear from residents.

  • BUDGET BALANCING

    Grant County escaped much of the brunt of a workforce reduction plan unanimously approved June 22 by the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

    A total of 26 full-time equivalent positions are included in the layoff plan with 14 positions currently vacant and  two positions being reduced from full-time to part-time status.

    Eleven people will be receiving layoff notices, said Dr. Lynne Saddler, district director of health.

  • Coroner settles into new role

    Bob McDaniel’s first few months as Grant County coroner have been busy. He’s been called to nearly two dozen death scenes, the majority of them where someone died of natural causes.

    To date, he’s had only a couple of fatality accidents that he’s had to investigate.

  • BUDGET WOES

    Dry Ridge Mayor Clay Crupper said he had to “cut down to the bone” in the 2011-12 budget.

    The city council approved the second reading of the budget during its June 6 meeting.

    The budget included $1.66 million in general fund appropriations, $104,950 less than current year’s budget.

    “It’s going to be awfully tight,” Crupper said. “We couldn’t give any raises. We couldn’t do nothing.”

  • Cable, Internet coming to Corinth

    High-speed Internet is just around the corner for residents of Corinth.

    The city of Williamstown is putting the final touches on a new cable system for the southern end of Grant County.

    Corinth residents are encouraged to attend an informational/signup meeting planned for 7 p.m. June 16 at the Corinth Community Center.

    The service is courtesy of a $535,000 federal grant through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Williamstown matched the grant with $134,000.

  • Fiscal court passes $11 million budget

    Editor's note: All numbers are taken from the county's proposed 2011-12 budget, which has gone through one of two readings before it is expected to pass in June.

    Appropriations:

    The total budgeted appropriations for the 2011-12 year is $11.004,057, a decrease of $91,000 from last year.

    Of that, $5,062,968 was appropriated in the general fund — about $175,000 less than last year's budget.

    The bulk of the rest of the appropriations came from the road and jail funds.

  • State OKs incentives for Ark project

    The Ark Encounter received the nod from state officials last week, which amounts to $43 million in tax incentives for the project that will construct a wooden replica of Noah’s Ark in Williamstown.

    The tax incentives were granted under the Kentucky Tourism Development Act. According to the state’s website, “eligible tourism attractions allows a rebate of sales tax up to 25 percent of a projects capitol costs over a 10 year period, provided the projects have a positive economic impact.”

    Local officials expected the state to OK the project.

  • IDA will take over tourism’s administrative duties

    The Industrial Development Authority will now be handling administrative duties for the Grant County Tourist and Convention Commission.

    The two sides finally came to an agreement April 26 after the proposed partnership had been discussed during several meetings.

    The move, which is expected to save the commission $10,000 annually, came after the commission voted in February to dissolve the position of director, relieving Judy Mullins of her duties.