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Government

  • Mayor, residents P.O.’d about changes

    The Williamstown Post Office soon will undergo changes that city officials and some residents aren’t happy about.

    Questions concerning the merger of services of the Williamstown office with the Dry Ridge Post Office have been circulating as the Postal Service looks to close 3,700 facilities and consolidate operations to save money.

    Chu Falling Star, district manager of Cincinnati District of the U.S. Postal Service, sent Mayor Rick Skinner a letter on July 26 notifying him of the changes.

  • Polling location could return to Jonesville

    The community of Jonesville soon may hear good news after the disappointment of learning the town’s post office and only bank may be gone.

    Members of the Grant County Board of Elections visited the Macedonia Baptist Church in Jonesville July 21 to determine whether the church can be used as a polling place.

    It has been more than 10 years since the community was able to vote without having to drive to Dry Ridge.

  • P.O.’d: Jonesville fights to save post office

    Williamstown is on track to be the home to Ark Encounter, Sparta just hosted an inaugural NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race, the Dry Ridge Post office just moved into a $1 million facility and the citizens of Jonesville are fighting to keep their little post office.

    “How come they’re picking on the Jonesville Post Office?” Katherine Harris asked Bob Redden, a Post Office Review Coordinator for U. S. Postal Service on July 12.

  • Ark is moving; groundbreaking set for August

    The Ark Encounter project is moving.

    Even though no dirt has been moved since the $150 million project was announced in November, there’s been much activity, mostly getting agreements signed, property purchased and data gathered.

    The project, which will involve a full-scale wooden replica of Noah’s Ark, as well as a bird sanctuary, a biblical village and animal shows, is on track for a ground breaking ceremony in late summer.

  • Will Ark park cost taxpayers’ money?

    What will the cost of the Ark Encounter be for Grant County?

    To date, the project, which is estimated to bring more than 900 full and part-time jobs to the community, has cost a little bit of money, a 100-acre piece of property, some cooperation and a lot of time.

  • Williamstown approves Ark agreement

    After some intense questions and some tense moments of silence, Williamstown’s city council voted in favor of entering into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Ark Encounter.

    Mike Zovath, senior vice president and Jim Parsons, attorney, for Answers in Genesis, the developer behind the Ark Encounter, came to the July 5 council meeting to assure council members that their approval of the agreement didn’t obligate the city financially, but would allow the project to continue to move forward.

  • Return to sender?

    If the Jonesville Post Office closes, Arbidella Richardson is afraid for the town she’s called home for many years.

    “When you lose your post office, you lose your town,” she said.

    In an effort to trim its budget, the United States Postal Service has closed small, rural post offices across the country and the Jonesville location could be next.

    Postal officials have scheduled a meeting at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, July 12 at the Jonesville Fire House to discuss the issue and hear from residents.

  • BUDGET BALANCING

    Grant County escaped much of the brunt of a workforce reduction plan unanimously approved June 22 by the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

    A total of 26 full-time equivalent positions are included in the layoff plan with 14 positions currently vacant and  two positions being reduced from full-time to part-time status.

    Eleven people will be receiving layoff notices, said Dr. Lynne Saddler, district director of health.

  • Coroner settles into new role

    Bob McDaniel’s first few months as Grant County coroner have been busy. He’s been called to nearly two dozen death scenes, the majority of them where someone died of natural causes.

    To date, he’s had only a couple of fatality accidents that he’s had to investigate.

  • BUDGET WOES

    Dry Ridge Mayor Clay Crupper said he had to “cut down to the bone” in the 2011-12 budget.

    The city council approved the second reading of the budget during its June 6 meeting.

    The budget included $1.66 million in general fund appropriations, $104,950 less than current year’s budget.

    “It’s going to be awfully tight,” Crupper said. “We couldn’t give any raises. We couldn’t do nothing.”