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Government

  • FEMA SIGN-UPS UNDERWAY FOR DISASTER ASSISTANCE

    If your home, business or property was damaged in the March 2 tornado that ripped through Crittenden, you may be eligible for assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Small Business Administration and time is running out to register.

    Officials from FEMA, the SBA and Kentucky Emergency Management, are worried that not everyone who received some damage from the storms will apply in time to be considered for assistance.

  • Project moving slow

    Things may be moving slower than expected, but the Ark Encounter is still coming to Williamstown.

    That’s the message Mike Zovath, senior vice president of Answers in Genesis, expressed to about 50 attendees at a March 13 meeting at Williamstown High School updating the much anticipated project.

  • WHAT TO EXPECT FROM FEMA

    • Inspector’s Call: After you register - either online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-3362 - a nine-digit application number is assigned. An inspector will call to schedule an appointment to visit your damaged property, generally no longer than 10 days after registration.

  • Federal aid available to tornado victims

    Grant County has been declared a disaster area and is eligible for federal assistance after the March 2 tornado ripped through Crittenden.

    Gov. Steve Beshear received notification March 9 that President Barack Obama has authorized assistance for residents of nine more Kentucky counties, including Grant, that suffered significant damage as a result of tornadoes and severe storms.

    The declaration brings the total number of counties receiving federal aid from FEMA to 16.

  • COUNTY’S PLAN WORKS

    Rick Willoby, Grant County’s director of Emergency Management, has a plan and when a tornado hit Grant County March 2, the plan went into action.

    But he wonders how many Grant County residents have a plan in case of a disaster.

    “You can’t wait until a siren blows to get a plan,” Willoby said. “This time of year is just the start of severe storm weather and you’ve got to know where you’re going to go and how you can check in with others after it’s over.”

  • Thayer gets bird’s-eye view of tornado damage

    Sen. Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, received a bird’s eye view of the damage caused by tornadoes in Grant County and other parts of Kentucky.

    Once he learned of the damage in Crittenden and Piner, Thayer contacted Gov. Steve Beshear’s office.

    He subsequently was invited to fly in a Kentucky National Guard Black Hawk helicopter Saturday as the governor assessed storm damage across the state.

    They first landed in West Liberty in Morgan County, which Thayer said was without a doubt the hardest hit area in the state.

  • Hendy to join Dry Ridge council

    The Dry Ridge City Council finally is back to full capacity.

    Gov. Steve Beshear has appointed 47-year-old Jim Hendy as the sixth member of the council.

    Hendy is filling the unexpired term of Jamie Webster, who turned in his resignation letter effective Oct. 1, 2011, for business and personal reasons.

  • Williamstown council approves new grave fees

    Grave opening charges for the Williamstown Cemetery have increased by $50.

    The Williamstown City Council unanimously approved increasing the fee from $525 to $575 at its meeting last week.

    Council also approved a new fee of $675 for opening a grave on Sunday.

    These charges were recommended by Mike and Dennis Stanley, who serve as supervisors of the cemetery located on Falmouth Street.

  • Volunteers needed for playground project

    The City of Williamstown was awarded a $20,000 KaBOOM Playful City USA grant to install new playground equipment.

    The grant comes in the form of $20,000 from KaBOOM with the playground equipment manufacturer donating an additional $6,000.

    Ten thousand dollars in matching funds must come from the community as well.

    To date, Kiwanis has donated $5,000 and the city has received commitments of $3,300, according to Mayor Rick Skinner.

  • Neighbors concerned about noise, traffic

    Of concern to city council and residents were traffic, noise, property values, increases in crime and the impact of a travel center on other developments being discussed for Barnes Road, especially after the state completes the widening of Barnes Road.

    There were several residents who spoke against the development, while no one from the audience spoke in favor of it.

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