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Government

  • ARK: YES OR NO?

    Is the Ark really coming to Grant County?

    Yes, yes, yes – at least that’s what Grant County officials say about the proposed $150 million project that developers announced in December 2010 would locate on a 160-acre site off the Williamstown exit at Ky. 36.

    “The developers have been in town this week, working on the project,” said Williamstown Mayor Rick Skinner.

    Skinner said he met with some of the project developers for dinner on March 21.

  • LAKE RESIDENTS SUE CITY

    Nearly two dozen property owners filed a lawsuit against the City of Williamstown on March 3 because of improper water treatment and removal of sludge.

    Also in question is the water quality for the lake, which provides much of the drinking water for Grant County.

    “Recently there has been discussion and reports amongst the community that the water in the lake may be unsafe to drink as a result of the treatment plant deposits,’ the lawsuit reads.

    Williamstown Mayor Rick Skinner  said the city tests the water from the lake daily.

  • Utility surcharge capped at 5 percent

    Residents of Williamstown might cool down after city council approved a 5 percent cap on the city’s utility surcharge.

    Surcharges on residents’ utility bills, which started showing up in 2009, happened when consumers actually used less power than the city contracted to purchase and the surplus was sold back on the open market.

    If the city paid $60 per megawatt hour, but the same hour sold for $40 on the open market, the cost difference falls back to the utility customer.

  • BRIDGE CLOSED

    The bridge on U.S. 25 in Williamstown is now closed.

    The bridge officially closed after morning traffic on March 1 and the closing doesn’t sit well with Williamstown Mayor Rick Skinner.

    “It’s very disappointing that it didn’t work out and I hope it’s not a huge inconvenience for the traffic flow,” Skinner said.

    Skinner asked the state to reconsider closing the bridge and keeping it at least open to cars and trucks.

  • Bruin resigns as Dry Ridge fire chief

    Fire Chief Robert Bruin will be leaving Dry Ridge at the end of the month to return home to Scott County.

    Bruin, who has been head of the Dry Ridge Fire Department for four years, recently submitted his resignation to Mayor Clay Crupper.

    The Scott County native is leaving to become chief of the Georgetown Fire Department, where he spent 16 years before coming to Grant County.

    Bruin’s last day will be Feb. 28.

  • Mayor wants bridge open

    Williamstown Mayor Rick Skinner doesn’t want the bridge at the south end of town to close.

    Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials said the bridge would close on March 1 due to safety concerns.

    Skinner has asked the state to reconsider closing the bridge and keeping at least open to cars and trucks.

    “I know the state considered two options, either to close the bridge or to set a weight limit at 6,000 pounds, but chose to close it,” Skinner said.

    He contacted state road officials and asked them to change their minds.

  • COUNTY TO ADD FIVE WEATHER SIRENS

    Grant County will be adding five new sirens to warn the community of impending storms or disasters.

    The Turn-Key Siren Warning Systems will be located at Williamstown Cemetery, the Dry Ridge Fire Department (replacing an old siren), Grant County High School, near KAO Campground and on the west side of Interstate-75 in Crittenden.

    The additional weather sirens will bring the total to 12 in Grant County.

  • Government offices closed President’s Day

    Several government offices will be closed on Monday, Feb. 21 in observance of the Presidentís Day holiday.
    The following will be closed:
    • Corinth City Building
    • Crittenden City Building
    • Dry Ridge City Building  
    • Grant County Public Library

     

  • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

    The Senate focused on promoting energy and election legislation that did not make it into law during last year’s session of the General Assembly, as well as introducing new legislation focusing on horse racing, child care safety and the state pension system.

  • LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

    The House passed several bills that have been at the top of our agenda for this session.
    House Bill 305 is considered our budget adjustment bill that will help address the state’s Medicaid shortfall. Specifically it would move $166.6 million from next year’s Medicaid budget to this year’s budget. House Bill 305 passed by a vote of 80-19 and now heads to the Senate for consideration.