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Education

  • Grease is the word

    Grease is coming to Grant County!

    Grant County High School will perform their spring musical, Grease, March 20-22.

    On March 20 and 21, the play will start at 7 p.m., while on March 22, the show will start at 3 p.m.

    Tickets are $8 and can be bought in advance at the high school or at the door.

    The musical features a cast from the high school and the middle school, with sets designed by art teacher Emily Figueroa.

    The play is directed by Faith Clifton and Cheryl Workman.

     

  • District Governor's Cup

    Four of the five elementary schools in Grant County competed recently in the District Elementary Governor’s Cup at Crittenden-Mount Zion Elementary. In addition to quick recall team events, students tooks written tests in the areas of math, language arts, science, composition, arts and humanities and social studies.Individual scores are as follows.

    The scores for Language Arts are:

    First place, Hannah Collopy - Mason-Corinth Elementary.

    Second place, Allie Schawe - Dry Ridge Elementary.

    Third place, Ryan Price - Williamstown Elementary.

  • Noteworthy Accomplishments

    Georgetown College

    Timothy Joseph Burgess, II, son of Timothy and Melody Burgess of Williamstown, has been named to the Dean’s List for the fall semester at Georgetown College, announced Provost/Dean of the College, Dr. Rosemary Allen. The Dean’s List honors undergraduate students who completed the semester with at least 12 hours and a 3.7 GPA.

    Burgess has also been nominated for membership in the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi at Georgetown College.

  • Friendship Foundation formed at Williamstown Schools

    Smiling faces and giddy laughter are contagious when a group of Williamstown students get together to play soccer and duck-duck-goose.

    Welcome to the Friendship Foundation, a newly formed club that features special education students being mentored by their fellow Williamstown School students.

    “All the teachers have to have a club,” said special education teacher Vicke Crowder. “Because we were special education teachers we decided to pair up our disabled students with non-disabled students to foster friendships.”

  • Local students named to Transylvania’s Dean’s List

    Transylvania University sophomore Justine Croy, sophomore Katrina Mineo and first-year Caleb Ritchie have been named to the Dean’s List for the 2008 fall term.

    To be named to the Dean’s List, a student must achieve at least a 3.5 grade point average during the term.

    Croy is the daughter of Steve Croy of Dry Ridge and Diana Wise of Skull Valley, Ariz.

    Mineo is the daughter of Brian and Paula Richey of Dry Ridge.

    Ritchie is the son of Danny and Kari Ritchie of Corinth.

  • Students named WKU Dean’s List

    Brittany A. Chaney and Jessica E. O’Flaherty, both of Dry Ridge were named to the Dean’s and President’s List for the Fall 2008 semester at Western Kentucky University.

    Students making the Dean’s List have a grade-point average of 3.4 to 3.79 in a 4.0 scale. To be eligible for either list, students must have at least 12 hours of coursework that semester.

  • Students named to UK Dean's list

    The University of Kentucky recognized the outstanding academic performance of nine students from Grant County who were named to the UK Dean’s List for the fall 2008 semester.

  • GCMS places students on honor roll

    A Honor Roll

  • GCHS student takes part in historical inauguration

    GCHS freshman Chelsea Cason knew that she was going to witness history, but didn’t imagine what else would come with it.

    Cason went to the national Presidential Youth Inaugural Conference and was in Washington, D.C. for President Barack Obama’s inauguration on Jan. 20. She was in the nation’s capital for the historic event and enjoyed a week full of speakers and exploring the history of the capital.

  • Local educator earns professional accreditation through National Forensic League

    Ryan Ray, a coach at Grant County High School, has received the Professional Forensic Coach Accreditation through the National Forensic League. This important recognition recognizes excellence in forensic education through competitive success, longevity in the field and commitment to continuing education. While the NFL is home to over 9,000 active educators, only a select number achieve this important distinction.