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Business

  • Looking for a job? One Stop could help

    Unemployed Grant Countians now have a new service available to help them find a job.

    A new One Stop Northern Kentucky satellite office opened March 7 in Grant County to provide free, on-site, employment services.

    The office, located at room 305 on the third floor of the Grant County Courthouse in Williamstown, will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

  • Library branches out!

    The Grant County Public Library is reaching out to the community beyond the walls of its Williamstown facility.

    Two new programs allow readers to get books to read without even stepping foot inside the library.

    The Outreach Homebound service is available to any residents of Grant County who have physical limitations or an illness that prevents them from traveling to the library.

  • Tourism director’s position dissolved

    Judy Mullins is being let go 10 years to the day she became executive director of Grant County Tourism and Convention Commission.

    The commission voted during its Feb. 16 meeting to dissolve the position of executive director March 1 and contract administrative services with the Grant County Chamber of Commerce.

    The commission will pay the chamber of commerce $1,700 a month for a year.

    The move will save the tourism commission a little more than $10,000 per year, said commission member Randy Slayback, who made the motion to dissolve the position.

  • DRY RIDGE POST OFFICE OPENING DELAYED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER

    The opening of the new Dry Ridge Post Office has been delayed because of issues surrounding recent inclement weather.

    The public will be notified when the $1 million facility on 1.4 acres of land at the corner of Brentwood Drive and U.S. 25 will be open.

    It will replace the current 1,500 square feet of leased space in the Dry Ridge City Building at 31 Broadway.

    The post office has been at its current location for nearly four decades. It was built in 1971, along with the city building under Mayor Howard O’Banion.

  • BUSINESS BOOST

    The economic boom created with a $125 million Noah’s Ark-centered tourist attraction opening in Williamstown could trickle down to surrounding cities.

    “I think it’s going to be a big impact for Dry Ridge with all the restaurants and motels we have here,” said Dry Ridge Mayor Clay Crupper. “There will probably be more jobs and everything else. I think there will be more hotels and restaurants.

  • Owen Electric rates increase

    The Kentucky Public Service Commission has granted East Kentucky Power Cooperative a $43 million rate increase.

    The PSC on Jan. 14 approved both a settlement and the resulting pass-through rates to be charged by the 16 electric distribution cooperatives that own and purchase power from EKPC. The new rate hikes take effect immediately and includes Grant County customers of Owen Electric Coop.

  • SNOW KIDDING?

    The first significant snow of the new year caused only a handful of problems earlier this week.

    An empty tanker truck jackknifed and over turned on Interstate-75 in the southbound lane between Crittenden and Dry Ridge at 9:23 a.m. on Jan. 11.

  • Thrift Store finds new home

    The Grant County Thrift Store has found a new home on U.S. 25 in Williamstown in the former Butternut Bread Store location.

    “We’re very happy with our new home,” said Sue Franco.

    The store moved from behind Grant County Drugs on Barnes Road to 1398 N. Main in Williamstown.

  • Crittenden company has grand re-opening ceremony

    Wolf Steel USA, a manufacturer of stoves and fireplaces in Crittenden, held their grand re-opening ceremonies Friday, Dec. 10, to celebrate the completion of their latest expansion project. The expansion consists of 69,000 square-feet that was added to the company’s existing 39,000 square-foot facility. It encompasses increased warehousing, distribution and manufacturing space.

  • Howe named loan officer

    Boston C. Howe, a Dry Ridge native, has been named a loan officer with Central Kentucky Ag Credit and will work with the Ag Credit lending team at the Lexington Branch.   
    He has a rich background in farming and livestock sales. He worked with S&B Cattle Co. at Bluegrass Stock Yards in Lexington prior to being named an Ag Credit Loan Officer.
    Howe grew up on the family farm in Grant County, which consists of 120 acres. The primary farm enterprise consists of a cow-calf operation and production of alfalfa hay for livestock consumption.