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Today's Features

  • Chris Ammerman has seen a lot of changes in his time as Grant County’s agriculture extension agent.

  • The beacon of spring in these parts is undoubtedly the native dogwood.  But, because of disease problems, especially dogwood anthracnose, people are seeking alternatives to Cornus florida.
     There are other notable dogwoods like Cornus kousa and Cornus mas, but look beyond the dogwood for small, spring flowering landscape trees that prove to have interest well into summer. Consider the Carolina silverbell (halesia) and the fringe tree (chionanthus).

  • Slow Cooker Swiss Steaks
    2 pounds boneless round steak

    8 medium new potatoes
    2 cups baby carrots
    1 medium onion
    Cooking spray
    1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt

  • Lately, people have been asking me about the eclipse and now the situation with North Korea.
    It seems whenever strange or crisis events are predicted, people become nervous. Of course, it’s only natural to wonder what is going to happen and I am reminded of the famous Y2K scare that was a huge topic in 1999.

  • One American flag flapping in the wind can be moving for most patriotic Americans, but 100 such flags with stars and stripes waving in close proximity can be breathtaking.
    Several years ago, the members of the Williamstown Woman’s Club were looking for ways to make a meaningful difference in the community, and they decided to display 100 American flags along Eibeck Lane for every veteran’s funeral held at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North (KVCN) in Williamstown.

  • I received a letter from a reader years ago that asked somewhat of a philosophical question regarding determinate tomatoes.  Yes, philosophical, because she asked why would we plant a tomato that sets its fruit, reaches a certain point, stops growing, ripens nearly at once and then dies?  
    Our love affair with homegrown tomatoes would more logically dictate that we grew only indeterminate tomatoes that reached monstrous proportions and yielded fruit into a first killing frost.

  • Recently, I met a woman who had moved to the area to stay with family after a painful divorce and some health problems on top of that.
    She had lost everything and was starting over.
    “I’m too old for this,” she said, although she didn’t divulge her age.
    She looked to be maybe 40, which isn’t old, but when you’ve lost everything and you’re starting over in a place you really, really, really don’t want to be but feel you have no choice and nowhere else to go, any age is too old, I suppose.