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Today's Features

  • I’m a sucker for a reunion story.
    In 2008, I covered the story of a couple who had been married and then divorced for 52 years. They had lost contact with each other until their daughter found her dad through an Internet search. By that time he was seriously ill, but well enough to come to Florida to be reunited with his ex-wife.
    The couple remarried, and the man died less than a month later. It was quite a story.

  • The Captain John Lillard, NSDAR chapter, honored Grant County World War II veterans in remembrance of the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor. Vice Regent Elisabeth Chiang, began with remarks about the 75th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor.  Chiang reminded everyone that on Dec. 7, 1941 the United States of America came under a surprise attack by the

  • Last year, we became quasi-temporary guardians of our youngest daughter’s two cats, Mohawk and Target.
    I say quasi-temporary because the daughter has since moved out after staying with us for a year, but the cats are still with us.
    Once our daughter left, we decided to move the cats’ litter box from the guest bathroom to the now-empty spare bedroom.
    To us humans, that’s a simple change, but not to the cats.

  • December has ushered in some seasonal weather with daytime temperatures hovering in the 40s.  For us, this is perfect winter weather to work in.  Brisk, but not too cold, it can be invigorating for animals and people alike.  The sheep and the big dogs seem to prefer it, in fact.  The playful frolicking is proof! The clear blue sky on a chilly winter day can be even more beautiful with a little winter plant interest.

  • Per a recent survey performed by NBC, 70 percent of Americans say the government is not working well. My question is will we rely on for true change for our nation? Roughly 100 years or so ago most the communities we live in relied upon the local church congregation for most their needs both physically and spiritually.
    The local church was the focal point of the communities and cities where people would first seek a good Bible believing and preaching church to live nearby and then would find employment to provide for the family needs.

  • Last Sunday I felt like I was under siege!  There were starlings everywhere; so much so that I feared being splattered with poop at every turn.  The surprising thing about starlings is that they are everywhere yet not from here.  It’s another story of one good intention going bad. Apparently back in 1890, in honor of a Shakespeare festival in New York City’s Central Park, sixty European starlings were released.  The following year another 40 were released and today the bird is one of the most numerous species in North America.  

  • Since 1997, Williamstown Baptist Church members have prepared and delivered approximately 6,000 Thanksgiving Day meals to needy families in Grant County.
    On Thanksgiving Day, Judy Ruholl, a church member, will help feed hundreds of people again this year.

  • Have you ever wondered what makes an orchid an orchid?  Well, it is all about flower parts.  In fact, most plants are categorized in the Plant Kingdom by their flowers.  For orchids, it is the fact that they have three sepals and three petals.  Many flowers have green sepals that protect the flower inside which cradles the bloom as it opens.  

  • Harold Elliston was honored on Nov. 10, at a luncheon meeting of KSP Post 6, at the Williamstown Baptist Church for his years of service to the Kentucky State Police.

    He was also an officer for the City of Dry Ridge for more than four years.

    Kentucky KSP Commissioner and Post 6 Commander Rick Saint-Blancard presented Elliston with a certificate of recognition and a Superman T-shirt.

    Many of his former colleagues stood and shared what Elliston’s mentorship meant to them personally.