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Community News

  • Truck weathers storm

    Doug Bowling weathered last Friday’s storm in his truck.

    He was trying to reach his home in Harvester’s when the tornado hit.

    “It started bashing into my truck,” he said.

    Bowling said roofs were blowing off all around him, but once he traveled about 500 feet further, it was simply raining.

    “I’ve never seen anything like this,” he said.
     

  • Family hides in closet

    Kelley Crook was at home with her husband and four children when the tornado smashed into their neighborhood.

    Crook, a nurse who works third shift, was sleeping when her youngest child awakened her up about 4 p.m.

    “My husband looked out and yelled for us to go to the basement,

    “The wind was whistling and I wasn’t sure what was going on,” she said.

    The family crowded into a closet under a set of stairs.

  • Woman takes refuge in basement

    Linda Jefferson rode out the tornado in her basement.

    “I heard the sirens and went down right way,” she said.

    From her basement window, Jefferson saw the tornado rip the next door neighbor’s garage door off.

    “It was like it was just a toy,” she said.

    Jefferson’s home suffered minor damage. She lost a small tree in her front yard and shingles from her roof.

  • ‘We can count our blessings’

    Todd Henage is counting his blessings.

    “It’s a miracle,” he said, standing on the sidewalk on Barley Circle on March 3, the day after deadly tornadoes ravaged Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio.

    Henage owns one of the duplexes in Harvesters Subdivision. Half of it was destroyed.

    He said he watched weather reports on Friday and was nervous about what he saw.

    “I’ve never been scared of a storm, but I’ll tell you this one made me antsy and I went to the basement.

  • Red Cross opens temporary shelter

    As quickly as the tornado devastated Crittenden, the Grant County chapter of the American Red Cross mobilized to help those in need.

    Once Diana Morgan, local coordinator of the American Red Cross, received a call from the Kentucky State Police and Grant County Emergency Management that assistance was needed, she immediately contacted the Cincinnati office and began setting up a shelter at Grant County High School.

  • Power restored after the storms

    According to a press release by Owen Electric, 8,000 customers were without power at the height of the outage caused by a tornado on March 2.

    More than 70 poles were broken off from the high winds. By 8 p.m. on March 3, only 635 members were without power, most of those in Campbell, Pendleton and Kenton counties.

    Outages and downed power lines or hazardous conditions, should be reported immediately to 800-372-7612.

  • Friends plan benefit for McCardle family

    Family and friends of the McCardle family, who lost everything in the storm last Friday, are planning a benefit on March 24.

    Bill and Rhonda McCardle lost everything in the recent tornado. Their home, barns, horse trailers, equipment but worst of all more than a dozen show horses.

    The McCardles have been supporters of 4-H and different organizations and now they need help.

  • Prescription refills available

    Gov. Steve Beshear signed an amended Executive Order on March 5 that will allow Kentuckians displaced by recent storms to access up to a 30-day supply of needed medicines from a pharmacist.

    Invoking legislation enacted in 2010, this is the first time this particular executive order has been issued.

    Grant County joins 23 other counties which have been affected by the March 2 tornado.

  • Four die following Friday tornado

    A green plastic coat hanger lay casually in the middle of Barley Circle in the early morning hours of Saturday, March 3.

    Bright pink drinking cups sat side by side on a dish drainer inside a first-floor apartment. A heavy stainless steel refrigerator hulked out of place in the middle of the kitchen, it’s cord dangling into space, while in the next room a baby’s bed, with the sheets and blankets still inside lay on its side teetering from the front of the building, which was no longer there.

  • Burn class offered March 22

    Do you know what you can legally burn in Kentucky?
    Open burning presents serious health risks.
    A free one-hour session,  Learn Before You Burn  will be offered from 7 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 22 at the Williamstown City Building.
    The program will be an overview of Kentucky s open burning regulations. For more information, call 859-743-0857.