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Today's News

  • INDICTMENTS

    The grand jury met Aug. 9 and returned indictments against 12 people.
    The indictment of a person by a grand jury is an accusation only and that person is presumed innocent unless proven guilty.
    Those indicted were:
    • Nicholas D. Martinez, 19, receiving stolen property with a value over $500 but less than $1,000.
    • Courtney D. Jines, 20, possession of a controlled substance in the first degree, receiving stolen property with a value over $500 but less than $1,000, promoting contraband in the first degree and possession of drug paraphernalia.

  • VAUGHT’S VIEWS

    With all the football he watches on the practice field or in the film room, Kentucky secondary Coach Steve Clinkscale doesn’t always want to watch football on TV when he gets home.
    Often, though, his wife, Jasena, has a different idea.
    “My wife watches more football at home than I do. I come home and I don’t want to watch football and she wants to watch football all day Saturday and Sunday. I just want to watch TV and relax. But not her. She loves watching football,” said Clinkscale.

  • The City of Williamstown supports the Ark Encounter

    I have worked closely with the Ark Encounter since Answers in Genesis announced the project in December of 2010.  Because of my work for the Ark Encounter, I was granted the privilege of cutting the ribbon at the opening ceremony.  As I stated then, we have had our issues and debates on how things should be, but we always work them out in a professional manner.  I think the safety assessment fee controversy has been the first issue to receive this much media attention.

  • Developing Kentucky’s workforce

    From the beginning of our administration, we have set the goal of making Kentucky the engineering and manufacturing hub of excellence in the world. We are off to a good start. We recently shattered our annual record for new economic development projects and we did so in only the first five months of 2017.  
    Many factors weigh into the decisions of businesses to expand or locate their facilities in our state. However, every business leader I meet with emphasizes the quality of our workforce as one of their most critical considerations.

  • New state law makes it easier to quit smoking

    For the nearly 900,000 smokers in Kentucky, there has never been a better time to quit.
    During the 2017 legislative session, the General Assembly passed much needed legislation to equip individuals addicted to tobacco with the tools they need to quit successfully. The smoking cessation coverage bill (Senate Bill 89) removes barriers that limit patient access to evidence-based cessation treatments.

  • GCHS hosts Gridiron scrimmage with Trimble, Louisville Iroquois, Prestonburg
  • Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North

    Travelers can see it from the interstate—the flags, the rotunda and the militarily uniform, neatly aligned, white marble headstones. There are no locked gates, just an open entryway with a golden eagle, wings spread, perched atop a concrete wall, a sentry keeping watch for sleeping warriors.

  • Parents, teachers should push for longer summers for students

    As we turn the page on July 2017, I find myself asking the same question once again, “Is summer over already?” To the disappointment of most Kentucky students, and many parents, the answer is an overwhelming “yes.”
    In Senate District 17, Scott County students will report back for classes on Thursday, Aug. 10. For Grant County students, the first day back is either Monday, Aug. 14, or Tuesday, Aug. 15, depending on your grade. In Kenton County, students are due back a bit later: Wednesday, August 23.

  • Patient-provider relationship is key to addressing Kentucky opioid crisis

    Opioid abuse is one of Kentucky’s most pressing and publicized health issues. In 2016, more than 1,400 Kentuckians died from opioid overdoses. That’s an average of nearly four deaths per day.
    These alarming statistics have made curbing opioid abuse a statewide priority—and Kentuckians of all backgrounds and sectors are committed to finding solutions.

  • Former resident concerned about Grant County

    I lived in Grant County 40 years, just recently moving to Richwood after my husband’s passing. I am deeply concerned about Williamstown and Grant County, in general.
    I am reading and hearing a lot of criticism about the Ark Encounter, and I am truly puzzled.